Wearing a collar indoors
  • 0
  • How many of you have your basenji collared indoors - Kipawa is. It has his name and our phone number on it. Kipawa is also microchipped. Kipawa will not be shown, and the collar does not seem to be wearing away or breaking off his fur.

    We have a very secure back yard with a 6 ft. fence, but I would just croak if he somehow got out, and I think the collar with the ID tag could make it easier for us to get him back.

  • 0
  • Houston

    I would just croak if he somehow got out, and I think the collar with the ID tag could make it easier for us to get him back.

    I agree..I am so scared of that too..but Pippin now only uses his when we are outside (per Tanza's recommendation since he will be shown), It actually hangs on our doorknob so we can easily put on when heading out..I did the same for Otis and he eventually learned to either jangle it or bring it to me when he wanted/needed to go out ..So smart!
    My other pack members have it on constantly, they actually seem to feel naked without it..Gus, the doxie will just sit there and stare at the collar on the table..for a long time..so I just let him wear his and Luna the muttqueen does as well..Moses is off and on, depending on mood, time or whatever else comes up….I loke how I can here his jingle jangle throughout the house..makes me know if he is into something...my giraffe trouble maker..:)

  • 0
  • T

    suki is not going to be shown, and she wears her collar are the time. it mooshes the hair down a bit under the collar, but that's all.

    i just think if she slipped out the door or under (or over!) the fence, someone would be much more likely to bring her back to me quickly. i think there's too high of a risk of somebody finding a collarless dog and thinking they are rescuing the poor, unloved creature and keeping it.

    her tag has her name, my phone number, and the word 'microchipped' in case she gets far away or my phone is not working for some reason, etc.; that way ppl will know they can take her to have the microchip read and contact me.

  • 0
  • Houston

    I have heard to put "needs medication" om the id tag, more folks are prone to take a dog in if they know the dog needs meds..they might not be as quick on wanting to keep it..Don't know how true that is though..mine only has their names, their "homemade titles" and my phone number..

  • 0
  • None of mine wear collars indoors…. if I only had one, I would consider it... with more than one, there is a great chance during play that someone will get caught with their mouth stuck in the collar (among other things they could get caught on).... and also there is the show thing for those of us that show our dogs. But mine are chipped.... and many times since they don't alway wear the same collar, there are no tags either.... Not like you can get "dups" of the rabies tags. That said, I carry my rabies cert in the car with me.

  • 0
  • None of mine wear collars in the house or in our yard. With multiples, as Pat said, the fear of them catching their mouths and not being able to get to them immediately is too big a concern for me. I'm 100% sure that they would grab each others collars if left on - as it is, the minute I put a leash on Ozzy and Aaliyah for a walk, Ozzy grabs Liyah's leash and wants to walk her (Liyah isn't impressed). All of mine are microchipped and their chips are scanned every year at their annual exams.

    I have each dog listed in my iPhone contacts (synced to my MacBook Pro and MobileMe online). In each contact it lists their microchip number, AKC reg number, rabies cert number, sire/dam (and their AKC reg numbers), breeders name & phone number, my phone number, my vet's phone number and the emergency vet phone number. I loaded everything in last year prior to the CERF clinic I went to…was a great help in filling out all their paperwork.

  • 0
  • J

    I had a very close call a couple years ago when two of mine were playing and caught tangled in collars. Too scary to risk again. Thankfully I was there immediately or both could have been hurt very badly (or worse). I agree with tanza and renaultf1. Multiples make a different dynamic. Mine only wear collars if we leave our property. Otherwise, inside and out, they are in their birthday suits ;) as they would be in Congo.

  • 0
  • I concur with Tlish - I think someone is much more likely to return a dog with a collar and tag as they assume they are loved and cared for. My dogs are all micro-chipped, but I know that our local shelter doesn't always check and I assume that might be true for many shelters. The sad reality is that it's probably better to make identifying a dog as brainless as possible for most folks in order to get them back. Because I am not going to show my dogs, I am simply not willing to risk them not being identified, and I have never had a problem with them getting their teeth caught while playing. I imagine I might change my tune if I had, but perhaps there are safer collars for rough play? Anyhow - those are my 2 cents - I keep hearing about B's getting out of their yards becoming lost, and to me, that is scarier than any other scenario I have heard.

  • 0
  • I have 5 Bs who all wear collars 24/7. They wear Rogz collars with Id tags on. It is law here that all dogs must wear ID when in a public place and although I have a large fenced in garden, I cannot guarantee that they will not escape. I also need the collars as grab handles on occasions when scraps break out. Not all my dogs get along all of the time. Only one of my dogs has lost a little fur due to the collar but it is no big deal. I show my dogs too :)

  • 0
  • @JoT:

    I had a very close call a couple years ago when two of mine were playing and caught tangled in collars. Too scary to risk again. Thankfully I was there immediately or both could have been hurt very badly (or worse). I agree with tanza and renaultf1. Multiples make a different dynamic. Mine only wear collars if we leave our property. Otherwise, inside and out, they are in their birthday suits ;) as they would be in Congo.

    I remember someone cross posted your incident a while ago. Prior to that I had always wondered if I was doing the right thing by keeping mine uncollared. After reading your cross post, I will never collar my b kids on my property - your story convinced me. Anyway, I love the au natural look as well. ;)

  • 0
  • All of my adult dogs wear collars with ID tags at all times. Most of my adult dogs are also microchipped but I would never rely solely on a chip to get a pet back to me. Animal shelters do not always scan for a chip and many good samaritans who find a pet have never even heard of a microchip. A collar with an ID tag makes it simple to get a pet back to it's owner quickly.

    I have never understood why show people are so concerned about the hair on the dog's neck. Starting about two weeks before a show, I remove the collar at night, massage the neck area, and put the collar back on the next day. You cannot tell that the dog has worn a collar by the time the show arrives.

  • 0
  • Mine are nudists at home, the tags jingle and bang on the food and water bowls, which startles them. They are chipped, and older. If they get out, they come right back
    home.

    On the occasional vacation, we keep the collars and tags on at all times, and I usually buy temporary tags where I list the address / phone numbers where we are staying.

    I am not concerned at home, but use every caution when we are away from home.

    If I had a youngster, might keep a collar on.

  • 0
  • J

    Good thread. Very interesting comments.

  • 0
  • P

    Normally I don't leave collars on at home because of the risks of accidents but also because I have one (Gbala) who chews the ends or buckles off collars if she can. Jewel, my oldie, does wear a 'Bioflow' collar though, to help prevent stiffness when she gets up. Gbala has chewed one of those but so far has left the latest one alone.

  • 0
  • First Basenji's

    We make a ritual out of uncollaring after walks and what not. We call our dogs over with the chant, "Let's get naaaaked…" And that's how they know it's time to take the collars off. My partner jokes that dogs, like babies, find nudity to be the most comfortable state. Kind of how like when I get home, one of the first things I do is switch into more comfortable clothes.

    So we don't keep their collars on at home. At approx. 6 years of age, both are quite mellow, and do not seem to exhibit ANY inclination to bolt or escape. We also only have one collar for each of them, so with all of their jangly tags, it just seems like a lot to wear at a time, all the time.

    Our Shiba, when he was younger, was a bolter, and so we kept his collar on a lot more back then, even indoors. He is also microchipped. We've lived in this one house now for over three years, and he has now come to naturally regard this as his territory and doesn't seem as inclined to explore the neighborhood as he was in his youth, when we had to move around more (he had lived in about 5 different places before the age of 2, so each new locale was full of explorable temptations outside).

    Bowpi is not yet microchipped because she has shown absolutely no inclination to bolt... but I will get it done eventually, regardless.

    My partner prefers to keep their collars on if we're both going to be out of the home for a longer period of time (which is actually very rare, given our lifestyles). In the back of his mind, there's a fear that an earthquake or some other chance mishap will occur while we're away and both dogs will be accidentally let loose. As paranoid as that might sound, I can see where he's coming from there...

  • 0
  • If I am traveling with the dogs, collars are normally on 24/7… At home, nope... I will never chance it... mine dogs are loose during the day when we are at work since we have a doggy room and a doggy door to the backyard which has 12ft privacy fences and paddlocked gates... we are set back from a quiet street and don't have to worry about "meter readers" since all the meters are in front of the backyard fence. One of the very reasons we bought this house....

    So, it is just not about showing, but about safety for my kids and the situation we have at home. I will not chance one getting caught in a collar either in play or in something in the yard when loose and alone.

    That said, still makes the neck hair much nicer if they are not having to wear collars and honestly... less work for me to have to worry about trying to "groom" the hair way before the show....

  • 0
  • Mine are only collared when we are traveling. I've had dogs catch their collar on furniture and knobs when jumping off things. I had to go to a wireless mouse and keyboard as my whippet kept catching her head in the cords under my desk

  • 0
  • @bewler:

    My dogs are all micro-chipped, but I know that our local shelter doesn't always check and I assume that might be true for many shelters.

    This is not true of most shelters, at least not in California. All the shelters I have experience with scan upon intake of the animal and many scan a second time just in case they missed it when the animal first arrived. Of course, it may just be they are more aware since every animal that leaves a California shelter now leaves it microchipped. In fact, most people in general are now aware of microchips and often take loose dogs to a shelter or veterinarian to be scanned for a chip.

    They do make break away collars for dogs but they aren't likely to stay on long if a dog has gotten out. Though I do use collars when away from home, I do not use them at home because of the risks of injury or death with multiple dogs playing. I have found in my neighborhood almost everyone knows me and my dogs, they see my husband and I walk them daily and most likely if any found any basenji running loose in the neighborhood they would probably end up at my doorstep.

  • 0
  • @MacPack:

    Mine are nudists at home, the tags jingle and bang on the food and water bowls, which startles them.

    Tag-A-Rounds are a great way to keep tags from jingling.

    http://www.phloyds.com/pettag/silencers.html

  • 0
  • Mine are nekkid at home. I used to have collar/tags on everyone until as a youngster Zest got her lower jaw caught on the malinois' collar twice in the span of 2 or 3 months. VERY SCARY. I'm a little slow so it took me 2 times to learn this lesson. While no one was hurt because I was less than 10 feet away, it also scared Zest, but not enough for it not to happen again. Thank goodness the mali had a quick release collar on, so I could get it off quickly. I can't imagine trying to unbuckle the collar in that sort of scenario. Yes, I know there is a risk with them being sans collar, but obviously in my house it was a definate that somebody (read Zest) was going to get their jaw caught on a collar. And i also know of 2 different people who have lost a dog due to another dog getting their jaw caught on the collar and strangling the first dog. The person with the Cane Corso solved this problem by getting a 4 inch wide collar that fits very tightly. (Of course now she only has the one dog currently.) I'm not sure this type of collar would work on a basenji.

    The very first day I had Zest, I put a collar with a phone number on her. (I don't even think the tag had her name on it.) I put her in an x-pen so that she could watch her new brothers (basenjis) and sister (malinois) and not get hurt or stepped on. She immediately tried to crawl out of the pen and proceeded to get her tag caught on the xpen. Again, i was only 10 feet away. I have also seen dogs get tags caught on crates.

    Hard to know what the right thing to do is.

  • 0
  • Wow, so many good reasons why to and why not to. Thanks to everyone for their comments.

    As Kipawa is the only dog here and is not shown, I think I will keep him in his home collar. We have care workers that come to our house in the evening. They know our security code and let themselves come in. I can see them coming, and as Kipawa is always with us, I hold onto his collar to make sure he doesnt bolt off. But all it takes is one time and he could be lost. He is Mr. Social and wants to always say hello right away to anyone who comes in our house. If he got out, I would be sick knowing he didnt have a collar on.

  • 36
    Posts
  • 4353
    Views
  • Log in to reply