Yearly Vaccines?

I haven't done yearly in many years, in fact many I don't do after the one or 2 yr booster. But thought I'd share this:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2010/04/20/petscol042010.DTL

I was very happy when my Vets were one of the first to accept the 3yr protocol…. many years ago!

Good to remind people of this however, because there are still many Vets that demand every year.....

The vets I go to try to push the vaccines on me and I just say "yes, he's up to date from the pet store" though he isn't except rabies every 3 years. Tests show many vaccines lasting many, many years after the first time.

That is a good article with a lot of truth to it. I work in a clinic where the vaccine protocol is tailored to the individual pet. Keep in mind that a lot of our vaccines are still only tested and licenced for annual re-vaccination. So the decision to extend the time frame between vaccines has to be discussed and agreed upon by both the owner and the vet - understanding that we are essentially doing things "off-label". Bottom line is this - finding a vet who you are comfortable with and who you can communicate with is paramount.

Just my 2 cents worth! 🙂

My vet initially insisted on giving my dogs boosters every year. The veterinary neurologist that treated my girl for distemper told me about titers testing and we have been doing that ever since. My boy hasn't had to be vaccinated for distemper or parvo for over three years now. Others at the vet's office have started doing titers testing too. I think some offices don't offer titers testing because the boosters are cheaper and easier…..

The Continuum brand by Intervet has been challenge tested and labeled for 3 years so there are options without being off-label.

One vet my parents took their dogs to had them do vaccines every 6 months! :eek: I convinced them to go to a different vet. That was ridiculous.

as far as i understand it is the norm in the UK for yearly boosters . That's a very informative article Debra, thanks for posting.
It quite rightly points out the problems people have asking their vets about it only to be told it is their policy to vaccinate yearly, end of story.
A vet hospital, quite local to us refuses to treat animals that are not up to date.
I would be interested to hear from other UK members what they do about boosters as it seems folks in the USA are ahead of us in this matter.

@DebraDownSouth:

I haven't done yearly in many years, in fact many I don't do after the one or 2 yr booster.

Debra, it's been 15+ years since we've had a puppy, so I don't remember exactly what was done in the way of shots when Maxx was a puppy, other than I know he had all of his puppy shots. I am in the camp that does not advocate annual boosters and would rather pay for a titer test than give unneccesary shots.

But your comment above raised a question since we do now have a puppy who is almost 8 months old and we might be getting a Basenji puppy later this spring (if we don't opt for an adult…we'll have to wait to make that decision once we see the breeder's dogs next month). After the initial rounds of shots when they're puppies, are you saying that they should have another round at age 1 or 2?

The current recommendations (at least by my Vet) is that they get their puppy shots and at 1yr (meaning 1yr after the last puppy shot) they get a booster and then start on the 3yr round. So, shots would be on the same schedule as Rabies, since they get the first as a puppy and then after 1yr, after that 3yrs.

I also do not have the shots at the same time. I wait at least 2 wks to have rabies done

Thanks, Pat.

Your comment also solved the question I had as to why our puppy got only a 1-year rabies vaccine rather than a 3-year.

Like I said, it's been 15+ years since we've had a puppy…I have a hard enough time remembering what happened yesterday, let alone so long ago! 🙂

Houston

How do you find a vet that does titers? Most vets here in my area won't do them..I guess because you won't visit them as often if they did do titers.
I would love to find one though, as I don't believe in over medicating (or preventing ??)if not necessary..
Pippin is due for his shots next friday..so I will take him to my new vet, but rather not take them (him or my other three dogs) all in yearly, if the need is not there.

All 8 of my animals are due their boosters over the next 2 months. I have asked in the past if the yearly boosters are really necessary especially for my elderly dogs who have been boosted every year of their lives. I get told that policy is to boost every year - 16 months max. The problem I have is the boarding kennels will not accept the dogs without proof of boosters and won't accept titre tests either. I would rather not boost at all but don't have much choice.

@LindaH:

Thanks, Pat.

Your comment also solved the question I had as to why our puppy got only a 1-year rabies vaccine rather than a 3-year.

Like I said, it's been 15+ years since we've had a puppy…I have a hard enough time remembering what happened yesterday, let alone so long ago! 🙂

There is no difference in the vaccine's used at puppyhood, 1yr, and then given every three years… all the same vaccine.

@Benkura:

All 8 of my animals are due their boosters over the next 2 months. I have asked in the past if the yearly boosters are really necessary especially for my elderly dogs who have been boosted every year of their lives. I get told that policy is to boost every year - 16 months max. The problem I have is the boarding kennels will not accept the dogs without proof of boosters and won't accept titre tests either. I would rather not boost at all but don't have much choice.

That is a problem when you board, I agree….. but no different in the US when it comes to boarding unless at your Vet's who follow the 3yr protocol

Also i believe it can invalidate your pet insurance if your animal isn't up to date with boosters.

Shelley - there are many problems with insurance companies and Boarding kennels in this country if you don't have yearly boosters.

However - mine are vaccinated at puppyhood and then are on a homeopathic regime for the rest of their lives.

I do know that so many vets here insist on yearly boosters but it really doesn't make any sense. Even many of the vaccine manufacturers do not reccommend yearly boosters.

My vet says that it isn't necessary to give annual boosters - he always asks 'Did your children have a yearly booster?'

I haven't got the lnk at present but will send you information on vaccines when I have a break.

@Benkura:

All 8 of my animals are due their boosters over the next 2 months. I have asked in the past if the yearly boosters are really necessary especially for my elderly dogs who have been boosted every year of their lives. I get told that policy is to boost every year - 16 months max. The problem I have is the boarding kennels will not accept the dogs without proof of boosters and won't accept titre tests either. I would rather not boost at all but don't have much choice.

This is exactly the position we have here in Aus as well… As all our dogs are going into boarding kennels, (well most of them), Im finding that I have to vacc my guys, so I can have them board... Really annoying, totally unnecessary, VERY expebsive, and I dont want to have to do my 12 1/2 year old ACD at all. I have no choice though... I just wish that the Boarding Kennel Authority, (I have no idea what they are called), would get with the times and allow the B.K. to accept either the 3 year regime, or at the very least accept titre results...

The other thing i dont get, is why Im putting other boarding dogs 'at risk', by my dogs not vaccinated... HUH......... I dont understand that aspect at all. My dogs could be at risk, not the other vaccinated dogs there 😕 😕 😕...

@tanza:

There is no difference in the vaccine's used at puppyhood, 1yr, and then given every three years… all the same vaccine.

@tanza:

That is a problem when you board, I agree….. but no different in the US when it comes to boarding unless at your Vet's who follow the 3yr protocol

@thunderbird8588:

Also i believe it can invalidate your pet insurance if your animal isn't up to date with boosters.

In reality, titers are accepted by many. Most vets try to hold you hostage, ask them to talk to their insurance or see it. Or find a new vet/boarding facility.

It is like Kennel cough.. if they made you get it before you came in to board, sure. But vet boarding places drive me nuts when they have you get them when you drop off, it is a scam. Takes 3 days or more to take effect, by which time they would have gotten it if there and if have it, will give it to others.

YOU not your vet, determines what shots, other than legally required rabies, your dog gets. First call your state Vet board for state laws, then start calling vets and kennels to find one that accepts titers. Considering ALL the major veterinary teaching hospitals agree yearly IS NOT NECESSARY, I wouldn't use a vet who insisted on it because they don't have either my dog's best interest at heart, or they are uneducated.

Colorado State University's
Small Animal Vaccination Protocol
Veterinary Teaching Hospital

In the past there have been many different vaccination recommendations for dogs and cats from veterinarians across the United States based on the best available information. In light of new information, the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital is offering its clients the following vaccination program. This program is designed as the routine immunization program for Colorado State University's clients' dogs and cats living in Larimer County, Colorado, USA in conjunction with a complete physical examination and health evaluation. This program is modified for any patient with specific risk factors.

Not all available small animal vaccines may be suitable for our program. Infectious disease risk may vary and our routine vaccination program may not be suitable for all localities. Anyone using our routine vaccination program is encouraged to follow the guidelines that are its basis and use the program at their own risk.

For pet owners, your local veterinarian is your best resource to develop a vaccination program tailored for your pet. The health status and infectious disease risks of your pet should be considered in the selection of a vaccination program.

Our adoption of this routine vaccination program is based on the lack of scientific evidence **to support the current practice of annual vaccination and increasing documentation showing that overvaccinating has been associated with harmful side effects. Of particular note in this regard has been the association of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with vaccination in dogs and vaccine-associated sarcomas in cats – both of which are often fatal. With boosters (except for rabies vaccine), the annual revaccination recommendation on the vaccine label is just that -- a recommendation without the backing of long term duration of immunity studies, and is not a legal requirement. Rabies vaccine is the only commonly used vaccine that requires that duration of immunity studies be carried out before licensure in the United States. Even with rabies vaccines, the label may be misleading in that a three year duration of immunity product may also be labeled and sold as a one year duration of immunity product.

Based on the concern that annual vaccination of small animals for many, but not all, infectious agents is probably no longer scientifcally justified, and our desire to avoid vaccine-associated adverse events, we are recommending the described routine immunization program to our small animal clients.
**
This Program recommends the standard three shot series for puppies (parvovirus, adenovirus 2, parainfluenza, distemper) and kittens (panleukopenia, rhinotracheitis, calicivirus) to include rabies after 8 weeks of age for cats (Canary Pox Rabies only) and 16 weeks of age for dogs. Following the initial puppy and kitten immunization series, cats and dogs will be boostered one year later and then every three years thereafter for all the above diseases except for rabies in cats which receive the new safer canary pox rabies vaccine that requires annual boosters. Similar small animal vaccination programs have been recently adopted by other university teaching hospitals and the American Association of Feline Practitioners.

Other available small animal vaccines, which may need more frequent administration, i.e., intranasal parainfluenza, Bordetella, feline leukemia, Lyme, etc., may be recommended for CSU client animals on an "at risk" basis but are not a part of the routine Colorado State University protocol for small animals. Recent studies clearly indicate that not all vaccines perform equally and some vaccine products may not be suitable for such a program.

http://www.colovma.com/associations/2956/files/Small%20Animal%20Vaccine%20Guidelines%20final.pdf

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