Outside vs. Inside

Hi!!!
Okay, so here's the deal. I'll be getting a basenji puppy in a few months. I want a boy and I will name him Charlie. 😃 Yay!!! BUT it may have to live outside. Sooo what are the pros and cons for a basenji living outside? Should I try to convince my parents to let him live inside? Is inside or outside better? Help!

IMO No dog should live outside however ur talking about a Basenji IMO U can't have a Basenji live outside there not a dog that is going to do well with that . They need to be near there family !! I can gaurenteee that if u get a Basenji and have him/her living outside u will have ALOT of issues with him Please Don't get a dog if u need him to live outside!!

@phoenix3:

IMO No dog should live outside however ur talking about a Basenji IMO U can't have a Basenji live outside there not a dog that is going to do well with that . They need to be near there family !! I can gaurenteee that if u get a Basenji and have him/her living outside u will have ALOT of issues with him Please Don't get a dog if u need him to live outside!!

Okay, Okay, jeez sorry! Not my fault; my parents'! I do want it to live inside, but…you know....parents are just like that (At least with me). I was just saying because my mom's friend has a basenji that lives outside and is all happy playful and overall a good dog. So whatever I say she'll be all like "Well so-and-so has a basenji that lives outside and it's perfectly fine blah blah blah." But thanks anyways for the comment. The more people that reply to the thread and say 'No, have it live inside.' the better argument I have for it living inside. So, people, reply! REPLY!

Many of the 'escaping' basenji problems involve basenjis outside alone, and bored. In a place with perfect weather and a snuggly 'dog house', and a very secure yard, AND a companion for fun and play, it might be OK.

But…basenjis are pack animals and want to be with their pack, either human or canine. To put a single dog in a yard alone, to be played with for maybe an hour a day, is pretty sad to me. I assume you are living at home, possibly a student. You are probably gone all day, and you sleep all night, will you spend 5 or 6 hours every afternoon outside with the basenji?

If you know a nice basenji, I know how much you must want one of your own. But please think about waiting till you have your own place, if you can't get your parents involved in wanting a basenji as a 'family member'. They are very bright dogs and deserve lots of stimulation and interaction.

If you were rescuing an abused dog, then a good life 'outside' might be far better than what they had, but deliberately getting a pup, well, IMHO it deserves to be a loved family member...by everyone in the family. Believe me, if everyone doesn't want a puppy, there will be issues!

Anne

@jiggypig528:

Okay, Okay, jeez sorry! Not my fault; my parents'! I do want it to live inside, but…you know....parents are just like that (At least with me). I was just saying because my mom's friend has a basenji that lives outside and is all happy playful and overall a good dog. So whatever I say she'll be all like "Well so-and-so has a basenji that lives outside and it's perfectly fine blah blah blah." But thanks anyways for the comment. The more people that reply to the thread and say 'No, have it live inside.' the better argument I have for it living inside. So, people, reply! REPLY!

I find this very disturbing. I just adopted a Basenji that was kept outside and its home was a tool shed. The dog had no other companions and was alone far too much. My new Basenji was given up by her owners at 9 months old, because they didn't spend any time with the dog and it didn't socialize well. The dog didn't appear to like them! Basenjis need company, companionship, and lots of attention. Are you going to be able to train it and spend lots of time with your Basenji?

Why are you getting a Basenji puppy when you still live at home and can't do what you want with your pet? To be honest, it sounds like you are too young and not independent enough to own a Basenji. Sorry, but that is the way I see it.

IMO having an outside dog is not a humane thing to do especially to a Basenji. Dogs are pack animals and should be with their pack which includes the humans, DH is not crazy about our two sleeping in our bed so they do spend the night in their crates and also are in their crates while we are at work but they are out when we are at home acting just like another member of the family (Chase even pre-washes dishes sometime 🙂 ).

All dogs have 6 basics needs that must be met the first 3 are the ones everyone can name easily - Food, water, shelter. The second 3 are just as important and are the ones most neglected in dogs banished to outside living - Physical Exercise, Mental Stimulation, and Companionship.

Basenjis need human companionship. They need to know they belong and they need to be with their humans. In rescue, most of the basenjis that I helped to rehome were dogs that had all developed behavior issues due to be kept isolated from their humans either being kept in the backyard or in the garage. Some of the nuisance behaviors that they were surrendered for were escaping, non-stop fire engine loud howling, digging, chewing through drywall, destroying the fence, and ripping up landscaping. These dogs were rehomed where they became cherished members of the family but many always had issues with separation anxiety because of their early starts.

IMO if you are not in a situation where you can keep a basenji indoors as part of your family then you are not in a situation to bring a basenji home. If anyone in the household is not completely on board with the idea of owning a dog as a household companion then you have already created an atmosphere that is difficult to raise a puppy into a well adjusted adult. It is really hard to wait for the right time to own a dog but it is not fair to the dog if you can not provide them with the level of socialization as part of the family that they require for their mental health.

Well said.
Dogs need to be with their people, when the people are home.
If you can't give a dog the companion ship it needs as well as the time it needs, its best you wait to get a dog…ANY dog.
They are not yard art...they need to be part of a family.

Very well put, lvoss.

I agree with all of the above. Unless you're going to "hang out" outside when you're home, you should probably try your best to convince your parents that the dog will live both inside and outside. You need to be clear about this from the very very start esp taking into account potty training. I haven't myself tried to housetrain a puppy that's 5,6,7 months old after it was strictly outside until then, but I imagine it would be a bigger challenge than if the B was housetrained consistently from the time it came to live with you.

Also..how to say this….I do believe that most people here, people who belong to a forum dedicated to their breed, are the same people for the most part whose daily lifestyles are directly affected/influenced/shaped by the dog that "owns" them. I think that a lot of these changes in lifestyle have to do with sharing your physical space, i.e. the inside. I assume most of us here were happy to make these adjustments and so have a hard time wrapping our heads around the idea of a strictly outside dog.
I don't know why your parents would rather not have the dog inside, could be many reasons. I would think that of all breeds, one that doesn't have doggy smell, doesn't take up much space, doesn't drool, doesn't bark, etc, would be easier to live with than most. They are notorious for being destructive, that just means you adjust: you always have something acceptable for them to chew on and you learn to pick up your stuff. And the trash has a lid or is behind a closed door, food isn't left on the table.....
And you make time every single day to ensure that they get enough exercise so that they don't channel that energy into destruction.

I suppose I was trying to explain the reaction you're likely to get here....don't know if I made sense?

-Nicki

(apparently Liz has started posting to the forum, so Carrie/Andrew style we're going to be sort of confusing and post under the same name...)

@jiggypig528:

Okay, Okay, jeez sorry! Not my fault; my parents'! I do want it to live inside, but…you know....parents are just like that (At least with me). I was just saying because my mom's friend has a basenji that lives outside and is all happy playful and overall a good dog. So whatever I say she'll be all like "Well so-and-so has a basenji that lives outside and it's perfectly fine blah blah blah." But thanks anyways for the comment. The more people that reply to the thread and say 'No, have it live inside.' the better argument I have for it living inside. So, people, reply! REPLY!

Just because one person has a Basenji (or any dog for that matter) that they believe is "just" fine outdoors doesn't make it right. I can tell you as a breeder the I would never place a pup that was going to be made to live outdoors… not ever.... in fact they must have access to a climate controled area day/night. A dog is a family companion all the time, which to me means it lives with the family, not shut outdoors.... I totally agree that maybe this is not the right time for you to get a pup.

Does this puppy's breeder know that this pup will be living outside?

Hmm just a thought how about a cute fuzzy clean little Hamster ? 🙂

IMO these dogs should, and need, to live indoors with human interaction. Don't forget these dogs are not like others and, I believe, need constant interaction. Not just a couple hours a day. These dogs will regress very quickly and will (or can) become pariah very easily. As Lisa says, these dogs, unless they have constant human interaction have anxiety and separation issues when they are rehomed. If your parents will not allow you to keep this dog indoors, don't get it. And as Pat says, even if I lived in a year-round warm area, I would never allow my pup to be adopted to a home in an outdoor living arrangement.

While your parent's friend may have that dog outside, you see it once in awhile and it is ecstatic for a little human interaction. I would bet dollars to donuts that if you spent a little more time with that dog, inside or out, you would find some issues you would never want to deal with. Sorry, JMO

A little information, first hand about dogs made to live outdoors…. I placed a pup with a family, was totally assured the dog would be indoors except when they were are work, but provisions made to include a doggy door in the family room with an xpen, so that the pup could be out if they wanted or if the weather was cold/rainy etc., had a climate control area to be in. I even personally checked this out... Only to find out months later that the pup was living in the backyard with only the garage as shelter (not heated or insulated)... I was to be sure furious... when I confronted the owner I was told this was because they couldn't housetrain him.. ??? I asked have you really tried? You know you have to expect accidents?... housetraining doesn't happen overnight. They also had a older Chihuahua (that was also not housetrained) and I was told that the pup played to rough... I told them, we talked about that... and what to do to help the situation (as it turned out they were really both fine, but both played rough.. and there was lots of noise)... End result was a Basenji in very poor coat condition (and remember we are in No. Cal (bay area) and typically have mostly decent weather).. totally unsocialized, wild, unsure about people, barely leash trained... I could go on and on... Bottom line, I told them either the dog is intergrated into the family and the house or they should consider re-homing.... Answer.. oh but we love him?.. HUH??? he lived outdoors, you were never outdoors,... a quick hello, pat on the head, food and water doesn't cut it.... As it turned out the parents seperated and she had to move and couldn't take the boy.. thankgoodness for that and that my contract said that the boy comes back to me, period.. and no they can't sell him.... And believe me, it was a struggle to get him straighten out...
Moral of the story... in this case I didn't know this was going to happen and this could happen to any breeder... however, if I would have known up front that this was going to be the case, I would have never placed a pup with this person....

We are also living with my father for a bit since we moved from california. At first he was TOTALLY against the idea of 2 dogs in the house but he very quickly relented. Now he adores our tri boy and is constantly slipping him watermelon treats. We do have a pretty large back yard and when it's warm outside the dogs hang out there on their dog bed. They love it out there because they can chase rabbits, chipmunks, and other furry creatures. But we also go outside and play with them alot (Riley even plays fetch!) and they also spend a good amount of time inside with us. So they're 1/4-outdoor 3/4-indoor doggies. Since it's gotten colder they are only indoor doggies. So I think that a happy medium can be attained. IMO dogs have more stimulation and get more excercise while outside but that is not a replacement for human contact. It also helps that we have 2 basenjis so they are never alone. And they always get a long walk or go to the dog park in the evening.

Perhaps you can bargain with your parents. They might be just afraid that they'll be solely responsible for the dog or, as my dad puts it, the dog will "be a ball and chain". If you can't bargain with them then try to put off getting a dog for a bit. Another really cool and unique pet is a hedgehog.

Liz

@mauigirl:

IMO dogs have more stimulation and get more excercise while outside but that is not a replacement for human contact.

I am sorry to disagree about the more stimulation and excercise but having done rescue and voluteered at my shelter and seeing dogs from these situations this is absolutely not true. Most outside dogs are only getting enough physical exercise if they are being allowed to indulge in bad behaviors like fence running or some of the nuisance behaviors that I discussed before. Most dogs get the most postive exercise when they are interacting with their humans and playing with their housemates. The only way an outdoor dog is getting more mental stimulation than an indoor dog with regular human contact is because it is inventing ways to entertain itself which in almost all cases is going to result in an unhappy human. When I talk about a dog needing mental stimulation they need to work their brains, either through short training sessions, games, or interactive toys.

I do think that owners have many options for outdoor activities with their dogs to fulfill the need for exercise and mental stimulation but that human interaction is key to insuring that these are positive outlets and not contributing to nuisance behaviors.

IMO, if your parents are requiring that the dog be outside, don't get a dog.

"The only way an outdoor dog is getting more mental stimulation than an indoor dog with regular human contact is because it is inventing ways to entertain itself which in almost all cases is going to result in an unhappy human. When I talk about a dog needing mental stimulation they need to work their brains, either through short training sessions, games, or interactive toys."

I think you misinterpreted what I was saying. I do not think that a dog should only be an outside dog. But dogs that are kept only indoors are missing out on exploring new scents and being in their natural habitat, not to mention finding that perfect sunspot that alot of my rooms do not have. I am perfectly happy to see my dogs sprint out of the sliding glass door in order to try to catch a squirrel and watching their differing plans of attack. As for mental stimulation outside they have plenty of fun games that are played outside with them. And honestly, not all inside dogs have stimulation. I agree that when a dog is ONLY left outside they can engage in behaviors that could be detrimental to their health and the sanity of their owners. But keeping them locked inside is just as detrimental. Destructive behaviors are a sign of that. Dogs should be able to explore and have quality time with their humans. And training is a key part of that. I think the problem is thinking in absolutes: only inside, only outside. A happy medium can be arranged for us lucky enough to enjoy a warmer climate for the majority of the year.

Liz

This thread is about keeping a dog as an outdoor only dog. Everyone here who uses the term indoor dog does not mean that their dogs do not have access to the outdoors in either the form of daily walks or access to a yard. I consider the term indoor dog to mean a dog that spends the majority of its time with its humans where ever they might be, indoors or outdoors. I consider the term outdoor dog to mean a dog that lives away from its humans most of the time even if that time is spent in a garage or shed, it is the separation from humans that is the distinction.

I absolutely think that there are worthwhile activities for dogs outdoors but I do not think that simply opening a door and putting them outside fulfills their need for mental stimulation and physical exercise and can not be relied on as the primary means of providing these.

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