So tired of reading these…

I'm not some activist or anything, but being a B owner who is dedicated certainly leaves one to feel a lot of disappointment when reading through the available rescues on BRAT…

"placement reason: Max was not coping well in his previous home (2 adults, a teen, a 6 y/o, and 1.5 y/o twins, 2 other dogs and a cat). His previous family had a very hectic life and couldn't provide the attention and exercise Max needed."

  • One would think a housefull of people could take care of a dog especially since they have two others to take care of...they obviously have plenty of time to procreate!

"placement reason: Have 2 yr old that requires a lot of attention, small living area, both parents full time occupations - Rai needs owners who can care and spend more time with him."

-Why even get the dog then? Jeese, manage the situation...don't abandon the dog!

"likes both men and women? Yes, but is cautious of people."

-Came from a puppy mill. No wonder it's cautious of people. Prolly been treated terribly and hasn't even seen many people.

"likes strangers? Can be skittish around strangers. Best to give him a chance to warm up "

-I imagine I would be wary of people also if this was my SECOND time on the BRAT available adoptions page in the past year...

Just make me so sad.. Grrrrrr! :mad:

Basenji Mix

Yep - there are people who take these li'l creatures in on their terms only - before considering the animals requirements. So the stay is over for the animal when the pet cannot accomodate "their terms". These poor doggies are better off being without the ignorant owners - and hopefully find a family with love, care and compassion - i.e. you and me…

@TuckerVA:

I'm not some activist or anything, but being a B owner who is dedicated certainly leaves one to feel a lot of disappointment when reading through the available rescues on BRAT…

"placement reason: Max was not coping well in his previous home (2 adults, a teen, a 6 y/o, and 1.5 y/o twins, 2 other dogs and a cat). His previous family had a very hectic life and couldn't provide the attention and exercise Max needed."

  • One would think a housefull of people could take care of a dog especially since they have two others to take care of...they obviously have plenty of time to procreate!

I don't know about how things are at YOUR house, but it really doesn't take that long to procreate….. :p
{and actually, three children 5+ yrs apart doesn't exactly, IMO, indicate a real gift for procreation}

Not to in ANY WAY excuse giving up this dog for the reasons indicated, it is possible that the other two dogs are low-maintenance dogs/breeds, and they just were not prepared for life with a Basenji.

I'd rather people who find they are not cut out for it {and sometimes, they won't know until AFTER, what it may really entail} give up the dogs to BRAT rather than raise them miserably.

I'd rather see this dog go to a real Basenji person via BRAT than to be stuck with this family as they "deal with it". kwim?

No, you are right, there's no secret to procreation. Sorry it doesn't take long in your house. 😉

My real problem is what even get the dog without doing your due dilligence to research them a bit? I mean, I know it's not the same thing but when you adopt a child and you decide it's not the best thing right now…you gonna just give it up? Don't make the mistake in the first place is all I'm sayin'... THINK!

No, you are right, there's no secret to procreation. Sorry it doesn't take long in your house. 😉

My real problem is what even get the dog without doing your due dilligence to research them a bit? I mean, I know it's not the same thing but when you adopt a child and you decide it's not the best thing right now…you gonna just give it up? Don't make the mistake in the first place is all I'm sayin'... THINK!

(Server was lagging so this got posted twice... Sorry)

About 10 years ago my wife and I became the unexpected parents of a Korean Jindo, if you have never heard of them they are like 45 pound B's with a very bad attitude. Within 5 days I was ready to take Sami to the county and have her put to sleep, but Karin, how had been a Basenji owner, breeder and showed her own dogs, had a different attitude. Slowly she got it through my head that I wasnt dealing with a GSD or a Lab, that I had to drastically change my attitude. I can't possibly relate all the different ways I messed up before Sami finally began to trust me, but now she is one of the sweetest most lovable dogs i have ever had. Now, all I have to do is adjust to all the wonderful quirks of our new baby, Itty Bitty Basenji.

@TuckerVA:

No, you are right, there's no secret to procreation. Sorry it doesn't take long in your house. 😉

My real problem is what even get the dog without doing your due dilligence to research them a bit? I mean, I know it's not the same thing but when you adopt a child and you decide it's not the best thing right now…you gonna just give it up? Don't make the mistake in the first place is all I'm sayin'... THINK!

Oh yes! I do understand your point and agree COMPLETELY! But most people were brought up thinking "a dog's a dog", and don't "get" the need to do research before bringing one home, so it just doesn't happen.
It's possible they got the Basenji because they are "quiet, clean, and don't shed". And they may have thought they'd asked the right questions of the person from whom they'd gotten the dog. IDK.

I just had a conversation with my BIL about a week ago, because they are looking at getting a dog and want something easy on allergies and relatively small. They live in South Carolina; We live in Washington state so they've only seen photos of my two. He did a little reading on "hypoallergenic" dogs, recognized the photo of the Basenji
and was thinking this is the dog for them.

I think he was a little taken aback when I told him that I DON'T think it is the right choice for them. {hee hee, I said, "I don't think Jean could live with one" and he said,"What do you mean by that?"}

His wife is very clean, and likes order.
He is a retired Navy commander who loves dogs, and likes order.
They have an adopted dd, 6 yrs old,
they have very young grandchildren which visit for weekends and weeks at a time.

I tried to explain that not all Basenjis are great with strange children in and out of the house, that they CAN be destructive beyond the puppy stage, that things like pretty pillows, socks, chair rungs, etc. may not be safe, that they are runners in and out of the house, etc etc and so on.

I also told him what we LOVE about them – they ARE clean {just not tidy 😉 }, they are cuddlers, they are clowns, etc.

I went online and sent him info such as those lists of why you do and do not want a Basenji; I sent him links to breeders to contact for more information and to maybe go meet some Basenjis.

I suggested that IF they still want a Basenji, they look into adopting an older dog from BRAT; one that they will know is tolerant of children, isn't {overly} destructive, crates well, etc.
I also suggested they look into schnauzers, which may fit their bill a bit better.

I haven't heard anything back yet. I am so hoping they are making other choices.

Nothing…no amount of research or previous knowledge (which I had) could have prepared me for what it was like to actually live with a Basenji. The biggest hurdle was my wife and I realizing that we had to adjust to the dog's mentality, not the other way around. Once we got that, though, we did a lot better with her, and now she's a huge part of the family.

About three weeks ago my wife said if we ever got another dog it'd have to be a Basenji. No other dog is good enough. This is the same woman who was ready to wring the dog's neck if she got in the cat's litter box one more time.

I honestly think you can get as much book knowledge as possible about the breed, but it's really something you have to experience firsthand to see if you're "the right stuff" for the breed.

It is true that no amount of book learning really prepares you for the enormity of dog ownership, regardless of breed. I do think that anyone considering a new dog really needs to get out and spend some time with dogs of the breed they are considering or if considering a mutt then just time around dogs. This is still not going to prepare them for what it is like to have a dog in their own home, that they have to provide consistency and training for but it will give them some idea about the reality of dogs. Too many people rush into do ownership without doing any research. Shelters are full of these impulse "buys". It is also important for new owners to have good support and understand that they can shape the behavior of their new companions but that it takes work and effort on their part. Many shelter dogs are really eager to learn but need someone willing to take the time to teach them.

My frustration is that most people are not willing to put forth the effort to make any sort of honest attempt to make the dog work in their household. I was taught that getting an animal was making a commitment for life and I take that seriously. I don't understand not going the extra mile to get help to make it work and just dumping the animal on someone else.

I believe we have become so adept at a 'throwaway' society, that if it isn't easy-it's not worth it. I believe the same as you Lisa-I take my commitments seriously. When you get a dog-you get it for it's life, when you have a child, you can't give it back, when you get married, you work at it. It's not always joy and roses. Sometimes it takes work and patience to achieve what you want.

Nomrbddgs is right - we are a throwaway society. It is sad that a lot of people don't take the time to look into the various breeds before they buy – oh we wanted "a dog" for the kids to play with. It's what keeps the puppy mills in business. I give the different rescue societies a lot of credit for trying to place dogs in appropriate homes.

I got my male, Ali, through BRAT. The reason given as to why his family decided to put him up for aboption was that he grew 'larger' than what they expected and they had a small child and were fearful. What makes that SO ridiculous is that Ali may be the most laid back Basenji known to mankind! He is somewhat big for a B but a VERY sweet boy!!!! He was only a year old when they gave him up…

I think my DH was somewhat expecting a "dog is a dog" kind of dog. Jack and I are slowly training him that Jack is no ordinary dog, and he loves him for it.

Yeah, I don't think I really did all the research I should have when I got Jack. I had gone a little further than "quiet, low shed, etc" you know those myths, but I hadn't gotten quite as far as "put and paper products behind closed doors, because up on a table or counter ain't gonna cut it" HOWEVER, even though I hadn't done ALL my research, when I got Jack I got him to keep. He is in his forever home. Jack is pretty good, but even if he were awful, that would still be my attitude: I made a commitment to provide this dog with a loving and healthy home, and that is what I will do.

And it really bothers me that people still list Basenjis as "no bark" without also noting they are NOT mute, along with the "no" shed (wrong!!), ….

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