Antisocial
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  • N

    Newbie here….thanks in advance for helping.

    We have a 3 1/2 month old Basenji / Rat Terrier mix, we've been trying so hard to socialize her, but she is becoming so timid. We're enrolled in Puppy Kindergarten, she cowards behind me & (like a true basenji) so not into saying hello to the other humans.

    Lately, on walks she freaks when she hears another dog barking & forget her going out to potty!

    I've read so many post here, but I'm still confused how to help her!

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  • Hi, i dont know if you solved the problem with your puppy.. Anyway I will tell you what we usually do.

    All the time we keep with us something to reward him with. This works in general for anything you want to teach your dog.

    Start socializing your dog with your family, friends neighbors,etc. Anyone you have close and wants to help. Ask them to talk to you and ignore her.. Just to let her know she is not in danger or risk. If she runs away.. You just have to keep her on the leash to avoid her running. After a while talking. Ask them to give her some food, or something she likes a lot. She will associate saying hi to humans you talk to, with the reward ; and will keep saying hi just to get the reward..

    The reward not always has to be food.. It can be her preferred toy.. A kiss, anything she likes a lot. It is also true that this will change with the time.. So you can start with few pieces of food..(always small pieces, the goal is to train her brain, not to make her full and lose interest on the reward. ) And then move to kisses, scratching her belly or whatever you find out she likes.

    Be patient but consistent, they need many repetitions and good mood to learn something.

    Our 4 months old basenji already sits, waits on a command, and lays down and we all the time repeat and repeat the training to avoid him to forget.

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  • Ya that's a tricky one..started off the same (being scared of dogs barking and even car doors closing)..this was earlier on for him though at about 2 months old. For me it was just repetition; the more walks we went on the more he got used to noises-loud/unfamiliar. I would also let him know he was safe as soon as he was scared, just by saying "it's alright" and "good boy" in an exciting tone..worked for me!

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  • Pups do go through "fear" periods. https://www.berkeleyhumane.org/files/galleries/CriticalFear.pdf Hopefully she will improve. Reassuring a frightened puppy can backfire if you end up convincing them there actually is something to be afraid of. I like to be as "matter of fact" as possible. Distraction by way of treats or toys is great if it works. Sometimes you can set off a problem if you are anticipating one. Dogs are quick to pick up on your body language, and if you are tense they will interpret that as a reason to be afraid…..

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  • I agree, staying matter of fact and distraction by way of treats…. reassuring can lead to making them more fearful.

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  • K

    All sound advice here already. In addition: I am a big fan of flower remedies (Bach, Alaskan, Anaflora). They can be a tremendous support with emotional issues. A specialized therapist can help you pick the right one(s). Good luck!

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  • First Basenji's

    Below is some info for adjustment training, trying to socialize a dog that has fear issues in a group of other dogs is really scarey for your pup. Look up the information below and especially Grisha Stewart’s DVDs on BAT training have made her a popular seminar presenter all over the world. I took her seminar and learned so much. for each dog it is a different reason, but the conditioning makes it work for most cases. No time frame, just patience and time and effort! Find a trainer or behaviorist in your area that can accommodate the work.

    https://video.search.yahoo.com/search/video;_ylt=A0LEVyCJOMpVYpQAntlXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw–?p=Behavior+Adjustment+Training+Dogs&fr=mcafee

    http://www.dogwise.com/ItemDetails.cfm?ID=DTB1224EBK

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