Looking for red and white male

@Vicki:

That's how I feel about rescue. I know when I rescue I give a dog a safe loving forever home and I'll take the bad with the good. Rescue isn't easy because of all the quirks and baggage that comes along with an animal - but I wouldn't have it any other way. I have six dogs and love them all….believe me they aren't perfect, but either am I.

But, Vicki, you are in the minority. There are lots of people that choose to rescue a dog because they feel they are getting 'a good deal' in the money department. Or because they feel like that is the socially responsible thing to do, rather than purchase one. And most people are VERY unlikely to adopt a dog that has a fairly certain likelihood of a lifelong disease. Most people want to adopt a healthy, young, dog who is free of behavioral problems. And those dogs that fit that profile get snapped up really quickly in rescue.

@Quercus:

And those dogs that fit that profile get snapped up really quickly in rescue.

That's true. most never make it to the website.

My biggest problem is that BRAT still lists their strip test result so that it makes it seem like they are testing and their adopters don't necessarily know or understand the difference. So they get a dog that says "Fanconi tested? Yes, Negative" and do not realize that this statement was only good for the day it was strip tested and says nothing about whether this dog may be symptomatic later in its life. If BRAT is not going to test then they need to put a LARGE disclaimer next to this statement on their forms that says "DOGS ARE STRIP TESTED ONLY. RESULTS ONLY INDICATE WHETHER THE DOG WAS SYMPTOMATIC ON THE DAY TESTED AND DOES NOT INDICATE WHETHER THE DOG WILL BECOME AFFECTED IN ITS LIFETIME." Without this statement their forms are misleading and if people think the dog is "tested" so they are not testing then they are unlikely to catch the disease early if the dog does become symptomatic.

@dash:

That's true. most never make it to the website.

So, what happens to those who don't make it to the website?

They are adopted so fast they are never posted.

O how I wish they all were adopted that fast. Dream come true.

Rita Jean

@lvoss:

They are adopted so fast they are never posted.

Okay, I understand.
What happens to the Basenjis on the website that are there for such a long time? Do they remain in foster care?

I would think it depends on how and what has them for example a kill shelter to non kill or foster care or BRAT who ever has them.

Rita Jean

Houston

What happens to the Basenjis on the website that are there for such a long time? Do they remain in foster care?

Yes, they remain in foster..as far as I know BRAT doesn't get rid of dogs because nobody wanted them. Many fostervolunteers become "foster-to-adoptees, Some of the brat volunteers I have spoken to have had one or two of their foster dogs for months, maybe even years.

I could never be a foster. I would keep them all!!!!

@lvoss:

My biggest problem is that BRAT still lists their strip test result so that it makes it seem like they are testing and their adopters don't necessarily know or understand the difference. So they get a dog that says "Fanconi tested? Yes, Negative" and do not realize that this statement was only good for the day it was strip tested and says nothing about whether this dog may be symptomatic later in its life. If BRAT is not going to test then they need to put a LARGE disclaimer next to this statement on their forms that says "DOGS ARE STRIP TESTED ONLY. RESULTS ONLY INDICATE WHETHER THE DOG WAS SYMPTOMATIC ON THE DAY TESTED AND DOES NOT INDICATE WHETHER THE DOG WILL BECOME AFFECTED IN ITS LIFETIME." Without this statement their forms are misleading and if people think the dog is "tested" so they are not testing then they are unlikely to catch the disease early if the dog does become symptomatic.

Good point, Lisa…

@lvoss:

My biggest problem is that BRAT still lists their strip test result so that it makes it seem like they are testing and their adopters don't necessarily know or understand the difference. So they get a dog that says "Fanconi tested? Yes, Negative" and do not realize that this statement was only good for the day it was strip tested and says nothing about whether this dog may be symptomatic later in its life. If BRAT is not going to test then they need to put a LARGE disclaimer next to this statement on their forms that says "DOGS ARE STRIP TESTED ONLY. RESULTS ONLY INDICATE WHETHER THE DOG WAS SYMPTOMATIC ON THE DAY TESTED AND DOES NOT INDICATE WHETHER THE DOG WILL BECOME AFFECTED IN ITS LIFETIME." Without this statement their forms are misleading and if people think the dog is "tested" so they are not testing then they are unlikely to catch the disease early if the dog does become symptomatic.

That's fair. Or at least something that says strip tested as opposed to just fanconi tested negative. I will suggest that.

Houston

Originally Posted by lvoss
My biggest problem is that BRAT still lists their strip test result so that it makes it seem like they are testing and their adopters don't necessarily know or understand the difference. So they get a dog that says "Fanconi tested? Yes, Negative" and do not realize that this statement was only good for the day it was strip tested and says nothing about whether this dog may be symptomatic later in its life. If BRAT is not going to test then they need to put a LARGE disclaimer next to this statement on their forms that says "DOGS ARE STRIP TESTED ONLY. RESULTS ONLY INDICATE WHETHER THE DOG WAS SYMPTOMATIC ON THE DAY TESTED AND DOES NOT INDICATE WHETHER THE DOG WILL BECOME AFFECTED IN ITS LIFETIME." Without this statement their forms are misleading and if people think the dog is "tested" so they are not testing then they are unlikely to catch the disease early if the dog does become symptomatic.

That's fair. Or at least something that says strip tested as opposed to just fanconi tested negative. I will suggest that.

I agree on that being better verbage as well..

@vickilb:

I think some people are missing the point of rescue.

While I am not an expert, I do qualify as a Basenji lover for the last 17 years. That makes me an expert in Basenji love!:)

Would I still have adopted Hunter if he had fanconi? Absolutely. Is there a chance that my otherwise healthy 1 1/2 year old pup could test positive down the road? Absolutley again. Could I buy a basenji from a breeder and have it test positive down the road? I'm pretty sure there is a small percentage. Could my 7 year old that I got from someone placing an ad in the paper (gasp) :eek:test positive? Absolutely.

I adopted to give a dog a home. Healthy or not, I showed unconditional love.

There are no guarantees in life, any life. When you love, you know you will have your heartbroken. It is part of the cirlcle of life. Fanconi or not, does it really matter in the big picture?

My baby was tested probable infected do I love her any less, NO. I had her a little over a week when I found out and I could have given her back but I was attached and loved her and am willing to do my best for her. Since I have never had to deal with fanconi I dont know what those who have go through. I just hope that I stand up to the challenge. Now as far as taking in a dog knowing that this is their fate I cant say that I would be willing to do that right now. Maybe after I know what I'm facing I might be willingly adopt a dog knowing they are infected it all depends on how well I deal with it when the time comes ( hopefully that time is much later). I know I never adopt lightly, to me its a forever commitment the good and the bad. I'm still am thinking about adopting from bratt but having to face the unkown with another dog is scary. You can say I can do this, but until you go through it you never really know what you are made of. For you who are made of the right stuff bless you and the dogs you care for.

I know its easy to say you would, but honestly, how many people would really reach out and adopt a dog with Fanconi who have experienced the real thing?

The same applies to biting dogs or dogs with other neurological or medical and/or behavioral problems. It would most people stop and think hard about what they are getting themselves into.

I think its common knowledge whether its the Basenji Breed or any other, if there are medical issues that are known that will affect the quality of life of the pet and also greatly impact the life of a prospective owner both financially and emotionally then prospective owners are going to think twice when they also have options of obtaining dogs without these issues. Although it may sound cruel and harsh, I think this is reality.

How many of you would adopt a Bulldog with a Hemiverterbrae which in most cases will cost thousands of dollars to surgically correct? If with the surgery there is no guarantee that the dog will be healthy or even will be able to walk on all 4 legs. Many Dashshunds end up with back problems and Golden Retrievers have a very high incidence of Cancer, Osteosarcoma to be specific. This is why its very important to research the breed you are interested in so you understand the potential problems and how they can affect your life and your pets. Even then its a crap shoot because anything can happen.

If there were plenty of people out there willing to rescue a Basenji that is known to have Fanconi, then Brat would have a waiting list and finding these dogs homes simply would not be an issue. We all know this is simply not the case.

Jason

Because I feel it is unfair to both the dog and the human to place a dog without doing a DNA Fanconi test so that the potential adopter knows what they may or may not be getting into… maybe a solution would be to explain the DNA test fully to potential adopters and give them to opportunity to have the test done at their cost?... We all know that if the test is "Affected" will put the adoption in danger but in my opinion the reality of it is that if someone adopts a dog that developes Fanconi that person would most likely never adopt again.. ... If it was me... and this happened.. I don't know if I could trust a organization that has not done all they can to provide truthful information regarding the health of that dog.

It is a double edged sword... but for anyone that has had an Affected Basenji knows the challenges of dealing with the care and the cost of these Basenjis.

Pat the way you have just put this into words today I agree with you all the way. The way I see it some people will get "rid" of sick dog. So sad when dog becomes homeless to me even more sad when they are also sick.

Rita Jean

Like I said, it is a hard decision.. and don't get me wrong, I think that on the whole BRAT does a great job and wish as they do that they would be "put" out of business… And I really do understand the concerns if tested Affected.. and chances of adoption... but this is a real hot "button" with me... And I doubt there will ever be an easy answer...

@tanza:

Like I said, it is a hard decision.. and don't get me wrong, I think that on the whole BRAT does a great job and wish as they do that they would be "put" out of business… And I really do understand the concerns if tested Affected.. and chances of adoption... but this is a real hot "button" with me... And I doubt there will ever be an easy answer...

I agree with you Pat. When I was in the process of adopting Buddy I asked several times if he was Fanconi tested. The question was not answered after several emails. Only after I went to pick him up in talking the answer was "we can't afford it". I think that may be true and that they feel people won't want to adopt the dog if they do test and it's results are "probably affected".

Houston

How many rescue organizations across America does test for the various breed related afflictions..I wonder.
It can't be just BRAT that is opting not to do tests that are somewhat crucial, due to the fact that, A) they cost money and 😎 the dog wouldn't get adopted if the truth was on a piece of paper..
I am just wondering..
I understand what has been posted and agree, but yet I don't, it is like a double edged sword..
I hope I never get a fanconi afflected dog, but yet who's to say it won't get hypothyroidism or hip problems, or eye issues or ..the list goes on. You never know, even if you get a dog from a very reputable breeder what might happen..of course if you go through a breeder, and I mean a real breeder that tests and all, the odds are less, but are you truly ever out of the woods, as far as the chance..not just for fanconi, but all the other ailments they can get?
just wondering and typing out loud..so to speak.

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