More questions from a potential new owner
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  • Hi there,

    I am thinking about bringing a basenji into my life and am already in touch with a breeder who has 2 week old puppies that will be ready to go to their new homes in early March. I am a college student graduating in May. I'm taking minimal classes and don't plan to start working until the summer so for the first two months with my puppy, I will have pretty abundant free time. I've been reading through a few of the posts from potential owners and I have a few questions I was hoping you all could answer for me.

    1. I'm concerned about my dog developing separation anxiety and was wondering how to treat my puppy to best minimize the chances. I grew up with a beagle, another breed with the tendency to develop separation anxiety, but we had a second dog in the house for her whole life so that was never really a problem. It seems like most of the basenjis with separation anxiety on this forum are rescue dogs but have any of you raised a dog from young puppyhood that developed this problem? Are some dogs just naturally inclined to develop it or is it all about the treatment they receive?

    2. I am a little concerned about the fact that I also have a pet rabbit. Of course, I plan to never let them be alone together but I would like them to be able to be in the same room when I am watching them. Does anyone have any experience raising a basenji around other small animals? We had a rabbit in my house when I was a kid, which we got before we got any of our dogs. We owned a chesapeake bay retriever, a beagle, and a mixed breed dogs and all of them were fine around the rabbit without any training. They seemed to just understand that the rabbit had been there first and was therefore off limits. I think our mutt even had some sight hound in her because she chased everything that moved once she was outside the house. I am wondering, though, if a basenji might be a different story since they are so prey-driven.

    3. In terms of the sleeping situation, I plan to have the dog sleep in a crate at night while he or she is a puppy and then out in the living room whenever (if ever..) we can trust him or her not to be destructive when left alone. How important is consistency? If it was up to me, the dog would sleep in the bed but I also live with my boyfriend who isn't very into the idea. I would like to have the option to let the dog sleep with me when the boyfriend is out of town (which happens often enough, he is a musician that occasionally tours) but I am worried that will be a 'if you give a mouse a cookie' situation.

    4. A lot of people on here have asked the question of which sex is better to own and the responses seemed to be very mixed. Some say girls, some say boys, some say there aren't any discernable differences as long as you spay/neuter (which I plan to do). I want my dog to be as affectionate as possible and the least likely to have any aggressive tendencies because my boyfriend was attacked by a dog several times as a kid and (understandably) has some lingering fears. Anyone have an opinion about this? My breeder's vet told her that her basenjis were the most affectionate basenjis she'd ever met, so that should be a good sign regardless of sex.

    5. After graduation, I will be living and working in Florida for two more years and then applying to law school. I may stay in Florida but there is also a chance I will move to New York. I've read that basenjis are very adaptable and will do just fine in an apartment as long as they get sufficient exercise. Anyone on here have experience keeping a basenji in a city environment? Or any experience taking a basenji with you when you moved across a big distance?

    Sorry for the long-windedness, just trying to make as careful a decision as possible. I appreciate any/all advice!

    Thanks,
    Katie

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  • Biggest thing to address first…...Does the breeder you are getting the puppy from do health testing? Do they direct test for fanconi? and Do they take them to an eye doc to make sure their eyes are tested properly. They are prone to PRA and PPM. Make sure these tests are done along with some other ones like Thyroid and Hips.

    I got my female at 6 mo and she suffered from a bit of separation anxiety. Once we got into a routine with her she was somewhat better. It wasn't too bad, she would piddle in one part of her crate when we were gone and cry for a bit, but after that she settled down. I got my boy at 10-12 weeks old and he has never had any problem with separation anxiety. So I am not sure if it depends on the dog or what. But making sure the puppy is crate trained properly should be able to solve this problem.

    As for the rabbit, I think time will tell. You may not have a problem if the puppy grows up with the rabbit. But once the puppy grows I do not know what kind of situation will occur. I would keep bunny in a crate until you know you can trust puppy around bunny and then keep them fully separated when you cannot supervise them.

    I 'gave the mouse the cookie' and now they are both sleeping in our bed. Oops! I think consistency is key here. Though my boy will sleep in his crate at night if I give him something warm to cuddle up to and listen to about half an hour of whining.

    As for the sex of the puppy it depends on what you want. I love both of my dogs, but I love the attitude of my male more. Though I HATE where he pees on things. Up to you.

    Hope this helps a little bit.

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  • Separation anxiety. Didn't have it with the ones I raised from pups, have had it with two that I adopted older. In both cases I was able to get them comfortable with us leaving them alone, but I don't usually leave for many hours at a time. A good, secure backyard or kennel run can be useful in good weather. Basenjis do not do well on their own for long hours. Some are more tolerant than others, but I think it is possible to cause this problem by giving them too much "alone" time. You can also progress from a dog that is crate trained to one that has crate anxiety by confining them too often and for too long at a time. A dog that is crated while you are out should not be crated while you are home, IMHO.

    Pet rabbit. If you get a young puppy and it is raised with the rabbit I doubt you will have a problem. Works well with cats too. Part of the secret is how the rabbit feels about the dog. If the rabbit is unafraid, the dog is unlikely to change its behaviour (with that particular rabbit) as it gets older. I do think you need to closely supervise, and not just to protect the rabbit. As you likely know, rabbits can bite, scratch, and give a nasty kick, which could be too much for a young pup to handle.

    Sleeping arrangements…....well, you have to keep your boyfriend happy, but bear in mind Basenjis like to be part of the pack, and they also loath being cold. If your house is anything less than toasty at night, and you don't want to allow your Basenji in bed with you, think of a way to keep the area where you want him/her to sleep nice and warm!

    Sex......boys are sweeter. As has been said, the bitches can be such bitches! However, you are young and have a boyfriend and I have found the females much less interested in amorous encounters among their humans. The boys want to watch, or possibly join in. And a whining Basenji scratching at the door doesn't improve intimacy. ;)

    We have changed our location once, while we had our two girls. They adapted well, but we did put up a rather large dog run for them, and also partitioned off the kitchen/laundry area for their exclusive use when we couldn't supervise in the house. Later they graduated to "run of the house" once we felt they were trustworthy.

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    1. Separation anxiety. We didn't have much with Zorro when we got him. We took him home at 5 months and worked with him by shutting the front door for a second, then opening it and giving him a treat. Then we worked up to 5 minutes, 10 minutes, etc. to where he knew we were coming home and not leaving him forever. We also had lots of toys: kong, antler, stuffed animals to distract him while we were gone. We crated him for the first month while we were gone for longer periods (3-5 hours) and once we were comfortable with him we let him have full reign of the apt. Obviously, he destroyed a few things, like paper left out, pens, recycling, etc. but it was our fault for not putting it away. I think because you are getting a puppy, it will be easier to train him/her whereas working with a rescue dog, sometimes you don't know their psycho-social history so training can be more difficult. Just be sure to spend lots of time with him/her and socialize early! They are so much work, but worth it.

    2. I agree with Kruzner and eeeefarm. Keep the bunny in a cage and always monitor their interactions. Basenjis are hunting animals and have a very high prey drive.

    3. Ha, we tried to have Zorro sleep in his crate next to our bed for the first week. It was good because he made a lot of noise when he had to go out to pee but then we succumbed to his utter cuteness and let him sleep on the bed. He still woke us up when he had to pee. Now he sleeps under the covers ;) and is one of the pack.
    Once your bf adjusts to the pup, he'll probably give in too. It's hard to say no… especially on cold nights.
    And to comment on eeeefarm's observation of amorous encounters...yes, it is true. Boys want to watch. We have to close the door and give him a stuffed kong because it reallllly puts a dampener on your love life ;)

    4. We have a boy and while he somewhat aloof and does not go up to anybody and wag his tail, he is very affectionate with us. He wants to be leaning on us when we are on the couch, follows us wherever we go, and licks and licks us. He is very attached. On the other hand, we know an older b boy who wags and baroos for just about everybody. All the girls I know are bossy but very outgoing and affectionate. I think that as long as the breeder is reputable and tests her dogs and you socialize them at a young age, either sex would be loving.

    5. We live in a one bedroom apt in San Francisco and it's no problem. We have a big backyard but it's two floors down but we rarely use it, just when friend's dogs come over and have loads of energy to exert. We take him out once in the morning to pee/poop. At noon, we go to one of the many dog parks in our area for an hour or more. I walk him at that time 2-3 days during the week and have a dog walker the other days when I can't or my bf can't. Around 5, he goes out for an hour. Finally, he gets one last walk to go pee before bed. This works out really well for us. Honestly, the longest we've left him alone has been 7 hours. I feel uncomfortable leaving him with a full bladder and I KNOW he'll get into trouble if he's bored.

    Good luck!!! If you have more questions, please ask away!

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  • I got Oakley at ten weeks and he had terrible separation anxiety, which is 98% my fault but I also feel he has a disposition that makes him more prone to it. I didn't establish a crate routine as the first two weeks I never left him and gave in to every cry. Being firm in what you want in the future has to be motivation to follow through during the puppy phase. Big lesson learned for my second time around. Don't obsess over him/ her and start phasing alone time immediately into longer periods. As far as basenjis and bunnies, Oakley grew up spending a lot of time at my friends house who has a fenced yard and three bunnies, everytime she took the bunnies out to get some exercise she placed them in two connected octagonal gates an Oakley was fixed immediately and was preying on them, when holding a bunny he would try to nip at it… I have no doubt he would try to get it, if only because his instincts fixate on it.. I do believe a small level of trust can be built between a pup and a bunny... But I'd always be within arms reach at the farthest. As far as sleeping, I truly believe if you let him sleep with you then it makes the time alone less traumatic but whatever is your preference you will have to establish a earthy routine for it to work. I currently live in a two bedroom apartment and we do just fine, they are high energy but as long as exercise both physically and mentally is ample I think a dog can live in any dwelling. I have a boy, after three years of telling my breeder I wanted a girl an I can't be happier with a boy, he is very sweet. When I get a second it will be a tough decision, one I will leave up to Oakley and the breeder. From what I've heard on the forum basenjis can often have transitioning behaviors that can occur after a big change ( such as a puppy developing separation anxiety after being brought home) but with consistency in the daily routine I think it makes a different environment more manages. As is with humans and changes allow time for adjustment! All great questions, glad your asking them here where there's so many people eager to help. Good luck in your search

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  • A LOT will depend on the 'breeder' you are getting your puppy from. Some are much better than others at both raising and at being able to figure out which puppy works best for you. I find that neutered males make about the best pet ever. Like most breeds whose purpose involves being in a 'pack' the packs are typically female dominated so females certainly can be testing you for leadership. Early training will be important so figure out when you can do a puppy K class and while you don't have to compete in obedience, rally, agility etc. taking some classes helps to create a bond and gives the dog a job.

    While I know that you have your plans made - and that you seem organized and planful of adding a dog - it sounds like your schedule is a little too based on what you want - and adding a dog of any kind - much like adding a child - brings up a whole new set of variables - are you prepared to deal with them? I see many read flags - boyfriend afraid of dogs is something that I have seen have bad outcomes (for the dogs) for example. In any event - a dog from a good breeder, who will be there to answer your questions and suport you will be the most important factor.

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  • @bunnicula:

    1. I'm concerned about my dog developing separation anxiety and was wondering how to treat my puppy to best minimize the chances. I grew up with a beagle, another breed with the tendency to develop separation anxiety, but we had a second dog in the house for her whole life so that was never really a problem. It seems like most of the basenjis with separation anxiety on this forum are rescue dogs but have any of you raised a dog from young puppyhood that developed this problem? Are some dogs just naturally inclined to develop it or is it all about the treatment they receive?

    There is a tendency in some to develop separation anxiety but you can help mitigate that by getting educated and taking steps to reduce their anxiety. Get the book "I'll Be Home Soon" by Patricia McConnell and read it before your puppy comes home so you can be prepared before there is an issue.

    @bunnicula:

    2. I am a little concerned about the fact that I also have a pet rabbit. Of course, I plan to never let them be alone together but I would like them to be able to be in the same room when I am watching them. Does anyone have any experience raising a basenji around other small animals?

    I do not have experience raising a basenji around a rabbit. Mine have been raised around cats and do fine but a rabbit is a whole other issue. L'Ox would visit with another puppy who had a Guinea Pig in the living room and once he realized it was there he was obsessed with it. He is curious about the cat, he is absolutely focused and intense on guinea pig. My basenjis are all high drive though. I would make sure that you talk with the breeder about this issue and make sure that they steer you toward the puppy with less prey drive.

    @bunnicula:

    3. In terms of the sleeping situation, I plan to have the dog sleep in a crate at night while he or she is a puppy and then out in the living room whenever (if ever..) we can trust him or her not to be destructive when left alone. How important is consistency? If it was up to me, the dog would sleep in the bed but I also live with my boyfriend who isn't very into the idea. I would like to have the option to let the dog sleep with me when the boyfriend is out of town (which happens often enough, he is a musician that occasionally tours) but I am worried that will be a 'if you give a mouse a cookie' situation.

    I don't know that the puppy will ever be really keen on sleeping in the living room by itself. It may find being in a crate in the bedroom with you preferable to loose alone in the living room. As for bed time, all mine start in crates in the bedroom and earn time in the bed. My husband's criteria for bed time has dropped very low though and so though he complains about the crowded bed, he is the one sneaking the puppy into bed at 3am. As long as you keep the crate high value and the pup is sleeping in it most of the time it will probably work out okay but as you get used to it, you may find you miss having it bed.

    @bunnicula:

    4. A lot of people on here have asked the question of which sex is better to own and the responses seemed to be very mixed. Some say girls, some say boys, some say there aren't any discernable differences as long as you spay/neuter (which I plan to do). I want my dog to be as affectionate as possible and the least likely to have any aggressive tendencies because my boyfriend was attacked by a dog several times as a kid and (understandably) has some lingering fears. Anyone have an opinion about this? My breeder's vet told her that her basenjis were the most affectionate basenjis she'd ever met, so that should be a good sign regardless of sex.

    Again, you need to be really honest with the breeder about your needs and expectation so they can match you with the puppy that best suits those needs and expectations. Each puppy is an individual and so though we can say in general "Girls have an agenda and boys haven't got a clue" when it comes to a particular individual the boy may not be the best choice, there may be a perfect laid back girl that is. I would be super concerned about the boyfriend though if he is has a fear of dogs. My Sophie, who is a doll, revs up to a yodel which to some people sounds like growling. A person who if frightened by this and even worse punished it would make a mess of her because she does it to express joy and wouldn't understand what she was doing wrong. It does sound different than her growl but most people who just meet her don't hear the distinctly different tone and intent especially if they have concerns about dogs. So even a truly affectionate and sweet dog may cause problems for your boyfriend and depending on his reaction he could cause really serious issues with the puppy.
    @bunnicula:

    5. After graduation, I will be living and working in Florida for two more years and then applying to law school. I may stay in Florida but there is also a chance I will move to New York. I've read that basenjis are very adaptable and will do just fine in an apartment as long as they get sufficient exercise. Anyone on here have experience keeping a basenji in a city environment? Or any experience taking a basenji with you when you moved across a big distance?

    Lots of socialization in lots different environments. Travel with your pup while it is young so it thinks of it as no big deal. We travel often with our dogs and they just go with it, it is part of what we do. Most of them have been on trips to visit family by 3 months old and we travel up and down the state for events a couple times a year so they get used to it.

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  • @bunnicula:

    Hi there,

    1. I'm concerned about my dog developing separation anxiety and was wondering how to treat my puppy to best minimize the chances. I grew up with a beagle, another breed with the tendency to develop separation anxiety, but we had a second dog in the house for her whole life so that was never really a problem. It seems like most of the basenjis with separation anxiety on this forum are rescue dogs but have any of you raised a dog from young puppyhood that developed this problem? Are some dogs just naturally inclined to develop it or is it all about the treatment they receive?

    I actually started home alone training from the day I got my basenji puppy. Not totally alone, first with my other dog. The other days he had to be alone if I went out peeing with the other dog and so on. He don't prefer to be alone, but it goes well. I wouldn't put him in a crate when being alone at all, I know that could make it worse, perhaps.

    2. I am a little concerned about the fact that I also have a pet rabbit. Of course, I plan to never let them be alone together but I would like them to be able to be in the same room when I am watching them. Does anyone have any experience raising a basenji around other small animals? We had a rabbit in my house when I was a kid, which we got before we got any of our dogs. We owned a chesapeake bay retriever, a beagle, and a mixed breed dogs and all of them were fine around the rabbit without any training. They seemed to just understand that the rabbit had been there first and was therefore off limits. I think our mutt even had some sight hound in her because she chased everything that moved once she was outside the house. I am wondering, though, if a basenji might be a different story since they are so prey-driven.

    I've had dobermans and a golden retriever with a ferret loose for many years, that went well. All those dogs grew up together with it. I think it's better when it grow up together. Meaning puppy AFTER a small animal. My basenji has gone alright with the cat living upstairs, and he don't want to eat it. I don't know how he is with small animals, but I've seen him watch them birds outside.

    3. In terms of the sleeping situation, I plan to have the dog sleep in a crate at night while he or she is a puppy and then out in the living room whenever (if ever..) we can trust him or her not to be destructive when left alone. How important is consistency? If it was up to me, the dog would sleep in the bed but I also live with my boyfriend who isn't very into the idea. I would like to have the option to let the dog sleep with me when the boyfriend is out of town (which happens often enough, he is a musician that occasionally tours) but I am worried that will be a 'if you give a mouse a cookie' situation.

    I've had dogs for many years now, and none of them have ever been left in a crate during the night or day for many hours. I'm not fund of crating at all unless it's necessary (like when the dogs are eating raw bones, it's okay to put at least one of them in a crate or both. Better safe than sorry, even though I trust both of them, I would be sure nothing happens. Both of my dogs sleep in my bed during the night, and that is totally okay with me and my boyfriend.

    4. A lot of people on here have asked the question of which sex is better to own and the responses seemed to be very mixed. Some say girls, some say boys, some say there aren't any discernable differences as long as you spay/neuter (which I plan to do). I want my dog to be as affectionate as possible and the least likely to have any aggressive tendencies because my boyfriend was attacked by a dog several times as a kid and (understandably) has some lingering fears. Anyone have an opinion about this? My breeder's vet told her that her basenjis were the most affectionate basenjis she'd ever met, so that should be a good sign regardless of sex.

    I've had one bitch, and the rest of the dogs have been males. I also have two males now, a flat coated retriever being 1 1/2 years old, and a basenji being 7 1/2 months old. Both unaltered. Both of them are veeery cozy and always demands petting/scratching, and they both also love people they know, and strangers.

    5. After graduation, I will be living and working in Florida for two more years and then applying to law school. I may stay in Florida but there is also a chance I will move to New York. I've read that basenjis are very adaptable and will do just fine in an apartment as long as they get sufficient exercise. Anyone on here have experience keeping a basenji in a city environment? Or any experience taking a basenji with you when you moved across a big distance?

    I live on the country side, but I'm travelling to the capital of Norway now and then, and another big city in Norway. He don't really care were we are, traffic or not. Of course he get a bit more distracted with lots of people and traffic, more than at home when we arrive, but he adapts very quickly. :)

    Good luck!

    Sorry for the long-windedness, just trying to make as careful a decision as possible. I appreciate any/all advice!

    Thanks,
    Katie

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  • Thanks for all the responses!
    I got to visit my breeder and her adult dogs yesterday and I totally fell in love with them. I am going back to put a deposit down later this week.
    And of course I asked about the health testing, which she does and even offered to let me talk to her vet if I wanted to double check.
    Other than the Patricia McConnell mentioned above, does anyone recommend any good Basenji books I should read before I get my pup?

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  • The vet can not verify the health testing that we are talking about and many vets are not even aware of the breed specific health testing that should be done. Please familiarize yourself with the CHIC requirements for the breed,http://www.caninehealthinfo.org/brdreqs.html?breed=BJ and the OFA website, http://www.offa.org and verify for yourself that both parents have been tested for Fanconi and at least one parent is Clear, preferably by Direct Test. Just type in the registered name or registration number into the search field to see what health testing has been done.

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    It is important that you ask the breeder about genetic health testing for Fanconi Syndrome, eye problems, and thyroid. Many breeders also do hip x-rays for hip dysplasia. Are you familiar with the genetic health problems in Basenjis especially Fanconi Syndrome? There is no good reason to buy a Basenji puppy from a breeder without the parents and the puppy being tested for Fanconi Syndrome as it is not expensive nor difficult! I would not buy a puppy from a breeder without the other tests being done either.

    Jennifer

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  • She has tested for Fanconi, yes.

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  • And you confirmed this yourself on the OFA site? Are the parents tested with the direct test or the marker test? If only the marker test, has she submitted them to be retested using the direct test? Some people are getting results that are different with the Direct test than what they had with the marker test so retesting breeding stock is important.

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  • I am in the Tampa area, who is your breeder? I didn't know of anyone breeding locally, I have had a couple of people ask me about pups recently, it would be good to have someone to refer them to.
    Thanks!

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  • This is my breeder's first litter and I'm not sure if she plans to do it again next year. She bred one of her girls with a male from her breeder, who has guided her through the process of having her first litter. The original breeder I believe is Anne Webb-Pratt in Punta Gorda.

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  • @bunnicula:

    This is my breeder's first litter and I'm not sure if she plans to do it again next year. She bred one of her girls with a male from her breeder, who has guided her through the process of having her first litter. The original breeder I believe is Anne Webb-Pratt in Punta Gorda.

    Sorry, but I don't like the sound of it. Think with your head right now instead of your heart. Her first litter and she does not want to do it again? That is not the comment of a responsible breeder. It's the comment from someone looking to make fast bucks. Please please please find another breeder and as many have said, verify the test results yourself. Getting a basenji is a commitment of around 15 years. Are you ready for that? Bunnicula, I am not being hostile - I just love this breed and there are so many of them that wind up in rescues because people can't handle the time required for a basenji (LOTS of exercise) or don't want to deal with their basenji when they find out it has Fanconi and they don't want the 'hassle' of vet bills and putting the dog on the Fanconi protocol to keep them as healthy as possible.

    If you are serious, you can find a good breeder. They may not be real close to you, but I drove 5 .5 hrs. to get my Kipawa, and it goes down as one of the best 5.5 hours I've spent in my life. The Basenji Club of America has some breeder referrals. But you still need to do your homework.

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  • First Basenji's

    I don't have experience with a puppy, and the others have given great advice on the subject, but I have moved and traveled quite a bit with my basenji. While I assume each dog is different, mine has adapted well each time. (Although he does mope when we first move from a place where he has doggy friends in the home to one where he is the only dog.) We've lived in small apartments in larger cities as well as medium to large houses with fenced in yards in small towns/rural areas. I made sure to keep familiar items (mostly his stuff: beds, toys, blankets, crate, etc) around the new house/apartment and in different rooms, which seemed to help during our last 2 moves. Keeping similar routines also helped to ease into the new place, like keeping the same walking routines if possible. As others have said, the living situation will dictate how you exercise your B. Last semester, from September to November, we traveled a lot while I was doing research. At least every other week (although more often it was every week), we would drive 4 hours to the coast on Thursdays and return home Sunday nights or Monday mornings. It took a few trips to get used to it, but after the 3rd or 4th time, whenever I pulled out my suitcase and started packing, he seemed to get excited, complete with tail-twitching, toy tossing, and a B500 or two while I got ready. He would also get right into his car crate and settle down whereas before he would fight with me about having to ride in the crate (if it was up to him, he would roam the car during the whole trip). They are quite adaptable as long as you are consistent.

    Please take into consideration the recommendations of the others about the health testing. Check the results yourself on the links provided above. It would be heartbreaking to fall in love with a puppy that you were told is healthy only to find out later that it isn't, especially if you can prevent the situation. No one is trying to discourage you from getting a puppy, only trying to help you make an informed decision.

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  • I concur, check the health testing. However, being a breeder's first litter shouldn't be an automatic red flag, IMHO. Everyone starts somewhere. I have a close friend in another breed who started exactly the same way, helped along by the breeder she got her girl from, and now twenty years later she is a well respected breeder and a very conscientious one at that. I would ask about guarantees and return policies, however. A responsible breeder should insist on having the puppy returned to her if things don't work out.

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  • You are right, of course… not particularly a Red Flag if they are doing things as a responsible breeder.... BUT.... if she or her breeder have not done health testing or anything else with these Basenjis then BOTH are RED FLAGS.

    Moral of the story, do the reasearch yourself and check out health testing results yourself. DO NOT RELY ON WHAT OTHERS TELL YOU...

    And last but not least, as a responsible breeder most of us know just about everyone in the breed (maybe not personally, but we know of them)... and I know of no one in your general area. If you go to www.basenji.org and the to About Basenjis and Breeder Referral for the state of Florida there are three breeders listed. Being listed means that at least they are members of the Parent Basenji Breed club which is a big plus in their favor. If you look at the cities they are from the closest to you would be 149 mile and the furtherest 248 miles. Are any of these your breeder or your breeder's breeder?

    And here is a good link on how to screen potential breeders: http://www.tanzabasenjis.net/selectbreeder.html

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  • I don't think a breeder's first litter is necessarily a red flag either. She is a person who I trust, a friend and neighbor of one of my closest friends. When I asked her about health testing she mentioned Fanconi right away. She is having me sign a contract with her saying she will buy back the dog at any point in time. She's offered to dogsit anytime I go out of town. She is not a regular breeder in that she initially planned for this to be her first and only litter but she did say she is thinking about keeping one of the males from this litter to breed with her second female. She picked her breeder carefully based on the reputation of her dogs' sweet temperament. I met them and it's true–they're just about the sweetest and fawned all over me even though I was a perfect stranger. She decided to breed her own dogs based on a desire to carry on this temperament. I will verify that she does direct DNA testing for Fanconi before I put a deposit down but otherwise, I trust her.

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  • Again, I urge you to look for more health testing then just Fanconi. While that is of course important, it is not the only problem we have in our breed.

    And as a breeder, you have to ask yourself, what does this dog/bitch has to offer the breed? Breeders breed to improve the breed, not to just produce puppies. While it is not a must that you show your dogs, it is the best way to get other opinions if you are breeding to the Basenji Standard not only in conformation, but health and temperament. Same with performance events, while not a must, again it is a great way to know if you are breeding to the Basenji Standard.

    Will these pups be AKC registered? Does she sell with a spay/neuter contract? These are all legit questions and ones included in the link that I sent you which was developed by The Basenji Club of America (Parent Breed Club).

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