• @JayCee:

    Helena you made a wise decision to stop watching TV all those years ago, as it seems the majority of the Western world has lobotimised itself and lost the ability of 'common sense'.

    Probably 20 or more years ago, sci fi shows would feature future humans glued to reality tv with human competitions and such, 24/7. And I thought such a view was ridiculous, never going to happen. And here we are in the land of Housewives of XYZ, Survivor, pregnant teens, parents who shouldn't have one child raising 8 or more for the world to watch etc. I don't get it. The closest thing I watch that can be labeled reality tv is Project Runway and the various Andrew Lloyd Webber/John Barrowman musical cast series. Why anyone would revel in watching low/no class slime, fights, lack of morals and manners is beyond me. Yep, if you can't choose quality viewing, Helena's no tv makes sense šŸ™‚

    @Vintinck:

    I think both the mentioned television trainers have some things to offer, but both are far from ideal. Like most people said above, most of CM's techniques won't work well with a Basenji's personality.

    CM's techniques are not good for ANY dog. I think you are failing to comprehend his training borders abuse. Victoria is a pretty common sense trainer who understands (as is almost always the case) that the ones needing training are the owners. Not a precision incredible trainer, but I wouldn't worry about my dog in her care either. The difference is oceans wide.


  • There are definitely things I would never do that Millan does, like a kick or an alpha roll, but not all physical touch is bad and its not all abusive either. I wouldn't call a leash jerk abusive (although it can be if applied viciously like you see people do sometimes) and I have definitely used my feet/legs to stop my dog from going a certain way without kicking.
    Some of the highly aggressive dogs that he works with probably wouldn't respond to anything other than the dominance style of training that he uses. I don't think I've ever seen Victoria work with a dog that she needed to muzzle so it wouldn't attack her. On the flip side, there is no reason to kick or roll 99.9% of dogs.
    I agree that I wouldn't recommend anyone to try and copy his techniques that he uses with extremely bad dogs. If you are a relatively smart person you should be able to watch his show and filter out the things that aren't appropriate for your dog. I don't really watch it that often, but some of the dogs aren't that extremely badly behaved and he doesn't always use extreme techniques to correct those behaviors.


  • vintinck, any rough handling is BAD for a basenji. Anything but positive treatment will come back to "bite" you. Sorry to be so harsh, but that has been my experience. I have done rescue like forever, and these types of treatments put b's into rescue.
    Only positive training should be used..EVER!


  • I wouldn't consider it rough. Its more just to get his attention. When teaching sit. I'll give him the sit command. If he doesn't respond, he gets a slight tug on the leash upwards, at which point he sits and then gets rewarded. Its no rougher than a poke or a tap on the shoulder for a person. If he still doesn't respond I will guide him into the position.

    As for positive only? That is a little impractical. I don't think you need to punish your dog but some negative reinforcement it is good. For instance, turning your back to a dog that is jumping on you. Its not punishment but it is a good way to negatively enforce the bad behavior. Dogs, along with people, naturally use both positive and negative reinforcement to encourage or discourage behavior. Its not wrong to use a little of both.


  • I thought that turning your back to the dog was actually considered in the same category as not giving a treat. The attention is the treat. Therefore, turning your back is positive training. No?

    (I may be oversimplifying; I'm tired and the puppy will be up verra early.)


  • @Vintinck:

    I wouldn't call a leash jerk abusive
    Some of the highly aggressive dogs that he works with probably wouldn't respond to anything other than the dominance style of training that he uses.

    On the flip side, there is no reason to kick or roll 99.9% of dogs.

    If you are a relatively smart person you should be able to watch his show and filter out the things that aren't appropriate for your dog.

    As for positive only? That is a little impracticalā€¦.turning your back to a dog that is jumping on you. Its not punishment

    Going to try one more time, then I am done.

    Jerking a leash is abusive. Period. You don't have to jerk a dog off it's feet to be abusive. If you have to jerk a dog's leash, you need training.

    I WORK rehab with aggressive dogs. You bet I would kick, hit, hang up or body slam a dog who was charging to attack. But there is no excuse, ever, to use physical responses other than in such a DIRE situationā€¦ certainly not for TRAINING. What anyone with an ounce of sense learns is that aggressive dogs respond to aggressive responses with increased aggression. It is PRECISELY those types of dogs that CM is going to end up getting someone killed over. Your typical dog he is only going to harm it and its relationship with the trainer. THOSE kinds of dogs someone is going to use his methods on and get bitten, mauled or killed and the dog dead.

    If you are relatively smart about dogs and training, you won't waste your time watching that pos CM. You'll pick up some good videos or books or go to Youtube to find positive trainers to actually learn from.

    And you seem to not grasp positive training. Positive training doesn't mean you always reward a dog. It sure doesn't mean you don't apply negative reinforcement. Of course ignoring a dog or turning your back is done by POSITIVE trainers. Unlike the old days when people were told to step on the dogs feet if they jumped up! Or give a strong leash correction.


  • cesar millan doesn't do anything but physically exert his will on dogs. it's not a good scenario. he may be cute and entertaining, but he is not a good dog trainer. i would classify him more as an enforcer - someone to be feared, but not someone to be loved and respected.


  • Seems like people are using the same terms to apply to different thingsā€¦.
    Negative Punishment - removal of something to decrease a behavior, such as turning your back/ignoring the dog.
    Positive punishment - addition of something to decrease a behavior, such as a leash correction.
    Negative reinforcement - I always have a hard time explaining this one even though I know what it is, so here's the definition from Karen Pryor website: "Removing something the animal will work to avoid to strengthen (increase the frequency of) a behavior. Heeling is traditionally taught through R-. The dog receives a correction when he walks anywhere except in heel position. Walking in heel position increases, because that is the only ā€œsafeā€ placeā€”because the threat of correction is removed by walking there. The key to R- is that an aversive must first be applied or threatened in order for it to be removed." http://www.clickertraining.com/glossary
    Positive reinforcement - addition of something to increase a behavior- treats, toys, praise.

    Positive training usually uses negative punishment and positive reinforcement, though I have heard of trainers who say they only use positive reinforcement but I've never seen any of them in action. I, like many others here am not a CM fan and I'm not a fan of Victoria either, though her techniques aren't dangerous or damaging like CMs. I would much rather people watch her show & try to copy herā€¦ I just don't find her all that impressive or think she's a really great trainer.

    (I'm also have puppy fatigue so I'm sorry if something isn't clear.)


  • @Static:

    Seems like people are using the same terms to apply to different thingsā€¦.
    Negative Punishment - removal of something to decrease a behavior, such as turning your back/ignoring the dog.
    Positive punishment - addition of something to decrease a behavior, such as a leash correction.
    Negative reinforcement - I always have a hard time explaining this one even though I know what it is, so here's the definition from Karen Pryor website: "Removing something the animal will work to avoid to strengthen (increase the frequency of) a behavior. Heeling is traditionally taught through R-. The dog receives a correction when he walks anywhere except in heel position. Walking in heel position increases, because that is the only ?safe? place?because the threat of correction is removed by walking there. The key to R- is that an aversive must first be applied or threatened in order for it to be removed." http://www.clickertraining.com/glossary
    Positive reinforcement - addition of something to increase a behavior- treats, toys, praise.

    Positive training usually uses negative punishment and positive reinforcement, though I have heard of trainers who say they only use positive reinforcement but I've never seen any of them in action. I, like many others here am not a CM fan and I'm not a fan of Victoria either, though her techniques aren't dangerous or damaging like CMs. I would much rather people watch her show & try to copy herā€¦ I just don't find her all that impressive or think she's a really great trainer.

    (I'm also have puppy fatigue so I'm sorry if something isn't clear.)

    Torture is a good example of negative reinforcement: I will apply this pain to you until you give me my desired outcome.

    a simple rule of thumb is that reinforcement makes a desired behavior increase and punishment makes a undesired behavior decrease. Positive means adding something to the equation, negative means taking something away. So you can combine those variables together in different ways to train anything.

    Most people avoid negative reinforcement, because although it is effective, it ruins the relationship between trainer and traineeā€¦and most people view it as cruel.


  • I knew I was getting something all confused there! Thanks for the clarifications.

    Again, I blame the puppy. šŸ˜ƒ

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