• @Kipawa:

    Okay, knock me on the head a couple of times. I have no idea why, but I fit the harness so that the leash attaches behind Kipawa's shoulder/back.

    Never thought of using it this way (since it's the wrong way) but last night I tried it and it fits Gossy perfectly and works great. Serendipity! It does have a lot of hardware (clips and adjustment sliders) and I worry about these rubbing. I think we will check into some of the other brands.


  • Thanks, Fran! Do you know if this harness prevents them from backing out of the harness and getting loose? My B-mix Jack seems to have a penchant for pulling backward and OUT of his harness lately. I am looking for something that will prevent him from getting out of his harness on our walks. He is very timid and when he gets freaked on a walk, he seems to be able to back out of his harness - I have tried 2 kinds and he has escaped from both. Luckily, as he has matured, he now longer feels compelled to run one fre, but it is disconcerting none-the-less!


  • @bewler:

    Thanks, Fran! Do you know if this harness prevents them from backing out of the harness and getting loose? My B-mix Jack seems to have a penchant for pulling backward and OUT of his harness lately. I am looking for something that will prevent him from getting out of his harness on our walks. He is very timid and when he gets freaked on a walk, he seems to be able to back out of his harness - I have tried 2 kinds and he has escaped from both. Luckily, as he has matured, he now longer feels compelled to run one fre, but it is disconcerting none-the-less!

    Well, Kipawa can be a squiggler, especially with this new leash, as he feels that his power has been taken away from him. Sorry Kipawa - that is the reason why you're wearing the leash! 🙂

    As long as you take the time to fit it properly, I would think even trying to get out of it by backing up would be difficult. Today I am going to fit the harness so that the loop/martingale area will be at the front of his neck, and then will attach the leash to it there.Now, it seems to me that you have to have your dog walk slightly behind you to have this work, otherwise the martingale area is going to be pulled to one side when your dog pulls. Then the placement of the harness is going to be lopsided and more apt to chafe some areas of the body? Hmmmmm….


  • @Kipawa:

    Okay, knock me on the head a couple of times. I have no idea why, but I fit the harness so that the leash attaches behind Kipawa's shoulder/back. I hadn't looked at the picture showing the correct placement where the leash attaches in the front. Attaching the leash on the back seems to work for Kipawa. Are there any physical concerns to doing it this way? There are still no areas being irritated.

    Yes, it negates the purpose of the harness.

    The purpose is to A) help you teach the dog to check in and look back rather than pull and 😎 NOT to engage the opposition reflex, which rear clipping harnesses are designed to do (they are "inspired" by sled harnesses).

    Yes, front clip harnesses (like any other) may chaff if the dog pulls enough. The purpose is to train the dog not to pull, so if your dog is habituated to the weird feeling of the harness and is just leaning into it and pulling hard enough to rub fur off you're doing it wrong!;)


  • @Kipawa:

    Okay, knock me on the head a couple of times. I have no idea why, but I fit the harness so that the leash attaches behind Kipawa's shoulder/back. I hadn't looked at the picture showing the correct placement where the leash attaches in the front. Attaching the leash on the back seems to work for Kipawa. Are there any physical concerns to doing it this way? There are still no areas being irritated.

    I have been using the Easy Walk Harness on Shaye and Gemma forever - it is the only harness that makes it possible for me to control them, since that "D" ring in front of their chests will turn their whole body when they try to go where I don't want them to go. I use regular collar leashes with their retractables when they will be able to wander around fields, but if we're walking in public, those harnesses are a lifesaver and make people believe (hahahahahaha) that the dogs are well controlled.:o


  • @CanisBasenjius:

    Yes, it negates the purpose of the harness.

    The purpose is to A) help you teach the dog to check in and look back rather than pull and 😎 NOT to engage the opposition reflex, which rear clipping harnesses are designed to do (they are "inspired" by sled harnesses).

    Yes, front clip harnesses (like any other) may chaff if the dog pulls enough. The purpose is to train the dog not to pull,

    Then the logical response is … don't use a body harness until you teach your dog to stop pulling ... if a dog pulls, the front clip will always pull off to one side; once your dog learns (by other means) to stop pulling then the body harness can be used.


  • @bewler:

    Thanks, Fran! Do you know if this harness prevents them from backing out of the harness and getting loose? My B-mix Jack seems to have a penchant for pulling backward and OUT of his harness lately. I am looking for something that will prevent him from getting out of his harness on our walks. He is very timid and when he gets freaked on a walk, he seems to be able to back out of his harness - I have tried 2 kinds and he has escaped from both. Luckily, as he has matured, he now longer feels compelled to run one fre, but it is disconcerting none-the-less!

    Well, Kipawa is not much of a back direction mover. He is all about getting ahead of me and checking out things first. But IMO, I think if fitted correctly, it would be hard for a basenji to back out of this harness. When walking your basenji with the harness, I have found out that for success, we have to also work on heeling. Then as Kipawa gets it, he will be rewarded with a little more leash, but not too much.


  • Well, yesterday I left Kipawa's harness on the coffee table. Bad idea! When I came out after my shower, it was on the floor and shredded up. I couldn't keep myself from laughing. 🙂 He looked at the leash and then looked at me, as if he was saying "I hated that thing and now it is dead!" I'll be off to our local pet store to pick up another one. You can't let your guard down with a young basenji!


  • I have to agree with CanisBasenjius "Andrea" harness attached to the lead behind the shoulders are designed to give a dog more pulling power. It is how not only sled dogs but pulling competitions find the most pull power in their dogs. Also with young dogs that have undeveloped growth plates it can creat a bull dog front. When a dog pulls with a chest harness they are forced to pull elbows out to the side away from the body, in time the muscle will be trained to move the dog that way and growth plates can settle in accordingly as well as muscle developement. We used a harness to bike one of our young pups years ago and were told by a vet we created the structure in his front movement by the developement caused by the pulling. We thought it was great exercise but probably wasn't the best thing for a young dog, with an older dog already mature in structure I don't imagine this would be the case.
    Therese


  • His half sister Lulu just recently redecorated her owners bedroom via the comforter. Her owner said, 5 years is too old for a comforter so Lulu was right to think it needed replacing. She signed it Lulu and her cohort incrimg (oops design assistant) Sonny and her mom who gets to shop for a new comforter and her dad who gets to pay for it.
    Thank goodness his litter sister Lyric has stuck to destroying toys.
    Therese

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