Hello, I'm Ashley

I live in Ontario, Canada and have a 3 month old Red Sable Male Basenji named Harley. He is definitely a handful to train. Ready to be the alpha at a moment's notice and is always up for play, usually involving nipping or pawing. He is very affectionate with every one he's met, including my boyfriend's 20 month old son, who was fond of pinching and pulling ears. 90% of the time an amazing puppy.

Does anyone know why he would reserve his nipping and pawing for his owners?😕

Hi Ashley and Harley, welcome to the forum. Lots of advice on here, but i will leave it to more experienced people to advise you. Have a look through previous threads too.
We have an 11 week old pup who likes to nip, pull clothing if she can get away with it 😉
We are working on discouraging it.
Are you going to post some more pics 😃

Welcome Ashley and Harley. Great to have you here on the forum, where you will learn tons!

Welcome to the forum Ashley and Harley!

Welcome to the Forum. Nipping can sometimes be discouraged simply by yelping when he does it!

What colour do you mean by 'sable'?

Yelp, then stop playing with him. Just walk away. He will figure out what stops the play. Welcome!

Welcome, I think you will find some advice in other posts.
Where did you get him from? If I can ask..we do have some folks from Canada on this site.
Also, I have to say, with pups this age, you need to get into a gentle basic obedience class with him.
It will help you both.

@Patty:

What colour do you mean by 'sable'?

Sable means he has black hairs, and/or black tipped hairs and black whiskers. It's pretty faint but he does carry the gene to have tricolored offspring… That is, of course, if he didn't have a special date with the vet.

@Ashley:

Sable means he has black hairs, and/or black tipped hairs and black whiskers. It's pretty faint but he does carry the gene to have tricolored offspring… That is, of course, if he didn't have a special date with the vet.

Pretty normal for Tri factored B's… to see the black hairs. Black whiskers however are not really an indication of Tri Factors....

Who did you get your pup from?

Genetically speaking, red and white basenjis are all sables but for most the black hairs fade as they age usually leaving them only on the backs of their ears and with tri factored dogs you will often find black hairs mixed in the tails.

Apologies. :o I didn't realize my explanation of sable would get everyone confused. I guess maybe it was too general. People are confusing sable, a coat color, with the genetics of the offspring. An abridged detailed explanation below the quote.

@tanza:

Pretty normal for Tri factored B's… to see the black hairs. Black whiskers however are not really an indication of Tri Factors....

Who did you get your pup from?

Second statement first: My boyfriend was in charge of finding the dog and dealing with the breeders. All I know is we picked him up 2 hours outside of Ottawa, Ontario.

First Statement:
A Gene has certain indicators.
"Indicator A" produces black without any tan on the dog. White markings are due to a different gene, and there are other genes that can modify the black to liver (chocolate Lab) or blue dilute (blue Great Dane.) If Indicator A is present, in most cases the dog will be able to produce black only.

Which is why Besenjis are more commonly black and white.

"Indicator B" in the absense of Indicator A produces a dog which is predominantly tan sometimes with black tipped hairs or interspersed black hairs. The usual term for this color is "sable." In examining dogs from breeds with Indicator B, generally there is no other black on the coat, the whiskers (the course, stiff vibrissae, not the "beard" seen with some terrier coats) are black if they originate in a pigmented area. Examples of Indicator B breeds include Collies, fawn Boxers and Great Danes, and some reds (for instance, Basenji red is thought to be.) Indicator B is recessive to Indicator A, but incompletely dominant to Indicator C.

Since a pup receives indicators from both parents, nature takes over and chooses the indicators for that pup, giving his coat a certain color. That is, a dog with both B and C indicators, is on average darker (more black hairs) than a BB dog, but the difference is generally within the range of color for the BB indicators within the breed.

After the indicators are determined for a pup then that it can be determined whether that pup has the potential to pass on certain indicators. Meaning if your mom has blue eyes and you end up with brown, that your kids will have brown eyes. There is a possibility of blue.

"Indicator C", if present in double dose (CC), produces a dog which is predominantly black, with tan markings on the muzzle, over the eyes, on the chest, legs, and under the tail. A Dobermann or Rottweiler is a good example of the classic black and tan pattern. The Bernese Mountain Dog shows the effect of black and tan combined with white markings, often called tricolor.

In the end, Sabled Red Basenjis can be BB or BC, but they must be BC for their offspring to have the potential to be CC (tricolored).

Unabridged Version- http://bowlingsite.mcf.com/Genetics/colorGen.html

Ashley, your description of basenji color genetics is not really correct. Basenjis have two gene locations that are responsible for the 4 main colors/patterns that we have. The first gene location is K which controls whether a dog will be black, brindle, or neither. Black and white basenjis have the dominant K allele which doesn't mean the majority of basenjis are black and white just that if you have the allele then you will express it. Brindle is either recessive to black or co-dominant which hasn't been well determined since black stripes on black are hard to see but brindle is dominant to the allele that allows for clear reds and tris. The second gene location, A, determines if a dog will be red or tri. These alleles are inherited separately from the Black/Brindle/Neither alleles which is why a black and white dog when bred to a tri can produce Black and white, Red and white, and tri colored puppies.

Basenji people do not refer to the reds in our breeds as sabled reds though as I stated they are genetically sables and are all born with black hairs in their coats though in most cases they disappear with age.

Thanks for the explanation of sables. I was confused as puppies here are registered as red/whites, brindles etc black hairs are not noted.

I am still confused rather by the genetics of coat colour described in your post. My 'bible' is Clarence C Little's 'The Inheritance of Coat Colour in Dogs' but I suppose that his book has been outdated with modern genetic knowledge.

Ivoss's explanations always make sense to me!

Aahley, if your boyfriend didn't check to see if the pups parents were fanconi tested, I believe you will want to get your pup checked asap.
It will help you know what you will be in for in the future.

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