• @wizard:

    Dog ownership is as much about training yourself as training the dog.

    So very true.

    Whenever my B acts up, he does sense immediately that I am unhappy. I have found it's best to not make a big deal about it. Be firm and quick about correction (in a non-violent way of course). Few situations where I got frustrated with my B he almost instantly picked up on the negative feeling and got offense. His hair would stick up (on his neck and back) and he would growl or try to bite. I think it's perhaps a natural instinct to be offense, they are of course nearly a wild animal (in my mind going off of statistics). Their instincts can differ from your average dog.

    So if he acts up, he will try to be offensive, but I pick him up by his scruff, tell him "no" and put him in his crate for a time out. He is not crated during day so unfortunately, the crate is used for time outs. Only use I have for it. If he still growls, a quick spray of water lets him know that type of behavior is unacceptable. After he does his time (not long, 15 mins usually), he comes out a different dog. He expresses his apology and is happy again. It has been very effective and he seems to understand.

    The tough part is keeping the frustration under control. I think that really triggers this offensive behavior in basenjis. It seems like they are wired to react to such feelings. If I can suppress the frustration and be a bit more neutral, he doesn't growl. He does know instantly when he has made a mistake. Few times he has had accidents he immediately will turn offensive if I recognize the spot(s). Again, best thing to do is grab him by his scruff, tell him "no" and isolate him while it is cleaned up. That has been my experience. 99.99999% of the time he is a complete angel. His tolerance shows that considering he does not wake badly, is very accepting of being picked up, etc.

  • First Basenji's

    How sad. It always concerns me when my B is acting like spoiled brat. My husband tends to react worse then me but we have not gotten bit. When my son wanted to name him Donkey, I told him no we would give him that as a middle name, but little did I know how appropriate it actually is. Don't let it get you down, he young and doesn't realize your the Alpha


  • @Quercus:

    I agree with what everyone else has said, he is pup, you made a mistake by allowing him access to things that you value. Live and learn…

    As for the biting...Basenjis will match your reaction, if you react to him with aggression and anger, he will do the same. To hit a dog for biting, will just increase the chances of him doing it again. I am not saying 'bad dog' is appropriate, but hitting is meaningless and frightening to a dog. It certainly doesn't teach the dog that you are the leader, if that is your goal...more than likely it teaches the dog that you are not to be trusted. If you feel you must use a physical correction there are more appropriate ones for dogs...and that doesn't not include alpha rolls.

    +1

    I'm sorry you got bitten, but I have to agree that he most likely bit out of fear and also that he is still feeding off your energy. Hard to let it go…I know...there has been some great advice given so far.

    I also think that you should read the following 2 books by Patricia McConnell:
    How to be the Leader of the Pack
    Feeling Outnumbered

    Feeling Outnumbered is about multi-dog households, but it specifically talks about what to do if you get bitten. One thing she talks about is how people often try to "stare their dog down" after their dog has done something wrong and how dogs actually take the stare as a direct challenge. What you should be doing is looking away (with your chin up). If you watch 2 dogs interact and one really pisses another off (and a fight hasn't ensued), you will see them look away and ignore the other dog.


  • It's all good now,

    I took my dog out and we both exercised like crazy, he seems happy with me and I'm definitely happy with him.

    😃

    PS: My dog bit me before I hit him, I think he just didn't want to be taken outside. He felt like I was pushing my alpha state on him and because of that he decided to attack.

    But yes, you live and learn and this is sure one of those.


  • Great! A lesson learned. He'll be a great B.


  • Sometimes we have to just cool off before any words or actions are spoken or taken. I know easy to say not so easy to apply. Here is a great example we got Jaycee in March and we had about 4 1/2 hour drive home with a puppy never gone in a car this far. Jaycee did great and she has been going in the cars every time she could. Here is the funny or not so funny on Sunday my husband ran to the gas station and took Jaycee the first time in his car and alone. He went right into the gas station and right back out but in his BMW little Jaycee took a poop in the backseat and then stepped in it and walked accross. I was outside when he got home and I ask him why he was holding Jaycee said she needed her feet cleaned and he washed them and then cleaned the backseat. He could have gotten mad but what for. Things happen and sometimes we are the adult we let it happen but love will always and forever get you so much more in return. It's over don't let you baby believe your still upset all said and done. New day have fun life goes to fast enjoy. Take care the both of you.

    Rita Jean


  • In your description of what happened you said he growled at you and you continued to try to pick him up and then he bit you. He escalated his behavior because his initial distance increasing signal did not work.

    You then said you think he knew he was wrong because he was acting submissive. As others have said, this is not true. He was offering appeasement behaviors because he could tell you were mad and did not want to further upset you. He was probably just as upset as you were because to him it must have seemed as coming out of the blue.

    A large part of training is setting up our dogs for success. When we fail to do that, like leaving them uncrated with access to things we value, as hard as it is, we only have ourselves to blame.


  • Exactly lvoss… as I always tell people.... if your pup/adult has an accident in the house, roll up that newspaper and smack "yourself" over the head.... because it is your fault the accident happened... not the dogs....


  • @tanza:

    unless you catch them in the act to chewing something up, they really have no clue that they have do something wrong if you punish them after the fact…. The fact that you showed your displeasure with him and put him where the mess was did nothing, IMO... just like with potty training, it does no good to try and punish "after" they have gone potty in the house (like the old rub their nose in it..doesn't work)... I am sure that he didn't have a clue what you were trying to teach him... and the bit would come from being scared by you.... again IMO....

    I totally agree Pat. Dogs are dogs. They are not people. They do not reason like a person does. The fact that a BABY was left out told him that nothing in the house really mattered, so have fun.

    @Danny:

    I'm pretty sure he knew what he did was wrong, because as soon as I saw him he was acting different, giving me the hint that he had done something wrong.

    I have never read any training technique that tells one to lead the dog to the mess and punish him for it.
    If it were a 9 year old human, sure, that might be the right approach… though corporal punishment isn't allowed nowadays!

    @Quercus:

    I agree with what everyone else has said, he is pup, you made a mistake by allowing him access to things that you value. Live and learn….

    I agree Andrea. I had a [then would-be] puppy owner that once said [after I made her go IN my bathroom and close the door so she could see the inside of the bathroom door that got chewed up from the doorknob down when a 6 month old pup got stuck in the bathroom] "I guess if you wanted stuff nice all the time you wouldn't have kids or dogs, would you?!!" We both laughed, because it is true…

    @Quercus:

    As for the biting…Basenjis will match your reaction, if you react to him with aggression and anger, he will do the same. To hit a dog for biting, will just increase the chances of him doing it again. I am not saying 'bad dog' is appropriate, but hitting is meaningless and frightening to a dog. It certainly doesn't teach the dog that you are the leader, if that is your goal...more than likely it teaches the dog that you are not to be trusted. If you feel you must use a physical correction there are more appropriate ones for dogs...and that doesn't not include alpha rolls.

    I also do not believe that hitting does anything…. it teaches the dog that you are a mean person and to be careful of you so you don't get hit, kicked, or whatever you choose to do to them.
    Really, if one is going to do that, WHY have a pet?

    @tanza:

    Exactly lvoss… as I always tell people.... if your pup/adult has an accident in the house, roll up that newspaper and smack "yourself" over the head.... because it is your fault the accident happened... not the dogs....

    Darn right!!


  • As an aside - some time after Gossy entered my life, she did something that really ticked me off and I yelled at her right away. I don't remember now what it was, but oh I was so mad :mad:. But what does she do - just like a teenager, she mouthed off at me (with this little rooor rooor)! Talk about diffusing the tension - I just couldn't help but laugh :D. I learned my lesson :).

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