• I posted this question over 2 weeks ago and never received any responses to my question.

    My question was:
    I will be bringing my new pup home in a few weeks on a plane and wanted to know if using puppy diapers would work. I remember last year when I brought a pup home it was a rather messy trip :rolleyes:

    Additionally, with potty training could you use diapers too? White carpets and puppies dont mix well :eek:

    Any suggestions I would appreciate.


  • Well….I have never used doggy diapers, but....I would hazard the result would be the same as having a Basenji puppy around human diapers....a really big mess!

    How long is the plane ride? Most people I know just use an absorbant or towel in the carrier.

    As far as around the house, I would definitely avoid it. Diapers would really interfere with the normal house training routine. I would try to keep the puppy off the white carpets, until she is housetrained. Or buy a steam cleaner 😉


  • The plane ride will be a little over an hour. Not too bad but in my past experience, the absorbant pads needed to be thrown out about every 20 minutes! The puppy was taken outside for a long walk but everytime I tried putting him back in the crate…another accident. (Man did he have a badder!)
    I ran out of puppy pads in less than 3 hrs.


  • I've never used diapers or pads, but I would imagine a basenji would create diaper & pad confetti pretty quick…

    what about really tiring this pup out for the trip? I mean REALLY tire this pup out. so he/she will likely sleep. I'd use some towels, and keep a fresh towel & a tall kitchen trash bag in your carry on so you can switch them out as soon as you can. (bag up the soiled towels if you need to)

    as for at home, I agree with keeping the pup off those white carpets until reliably housetrained. (months of no accidents)

    with the crate, be sure your pup empties his/her bladder before going in the crate. set your dog up for success. stay out until the dog relieves itself if going in the crate seems to become "habit". also, make sure the crate isn't too large - that is, not large enough to soil one end, and sleep at the other. when my dog was a pup, I blocked half the crate, and increased his space as he grew. this really helped to minimize crate accidents, in fact, he only had 1 or 2 while learning. If there is an accident in the crate, be sure to clean it REALLY well, so the scent is gone. Enzymatic cleaners work well.


  • I would recommend sending the sherpa to the breeder's house so the puppy can get acquainted with it early. I have flown with a puppy in a sherpa and it seemed to really help that she associated the sherpa with positive experiences and that she was really worn out from a full day of activity. I flew across country 5+ hours and no accident just a little whining when the meal was served. To this day if I take the sherpa out of the closet she rushes to get in. Her and her daughter will both try to crawl intot he same sherpa at the same time.


  • Thanks for all the advice..It sounds from everyones response that diapers are a bad idea. I'll look into shipping the sherpa bag to my breeder so the pup can get used to it.
    Now as for the carpets…Im really going to have to find a long baby gate. the only part of my house that isn't carpeted is the kitchen. I have wood floors and the living room is there. Its about a 7-8 feet long. I hope i can find a gate long enough. I've looked at baby gates and a puppy can climb right through the gaps.
    Any ideas on where I might be able to find one?


  • Vanessa we found a fenced in Pens that are collapsable worked for us. They are felxible & you can take them down at any time. We actually use ours to fence our backyard & we close up the drive way and the pooches can run around with no worries.

    Check these out..

    http://www.jbpet.com/Shopping/product.asp?catalog_name=JBWholesale&product_id=164-0209&category_name=CratesExPens

    http://www.jbpet.com/Shopping/product.asp?catalog_name=JBWholesale&product_id=164-0209&category_name=CratesExPens


  • I think that right now you need to start reading a LOT on potty training. Diapers…. absolutely not. Dog will shred, injest, etc. Puppies have accidents when owners don't watch them VERY carefully, and we all blink sometimes :)... so check out a good steam cleaner in case you need it. Just remember, they do grow up 🙂

    http://www.clickerlessons.com/housetraining.html

    http://www.paws.org/work/factsheet/dogfactsheets/cratetraining.html

    http://www.inch.com/~dogs/cratetraining.html

    http://www.canismajor.com/dog/hsetrain.html#Holder

    And if there is accident:

    How to remove dog urine stains and odors from carpet!
    This works for dog, cat, human or any other type of urine.

    FOR FRESH WET URINE.

    1. Blot dry with a white cotton towel. Soak up as much liquid as possible by blotting.
    2. Mix a solution of one tea spoon powdered laundry detergent (do not use bleach) to one quart of HOT water. Stir until all powder is dissolved. Put solution in a clean spray bottle.
    3. Wet the carpet thoroughly. Lightly brush area with a soft scrub brush.
    4. Blot dry with a dry white cotton towel. Remove as much moisture as possible.
    5. Pour out the remaining hot detergent and rinse spray bottle. Fill bottle with hot water. Rinse area and blot dry. Repeat this step at least 3 times.
    6. Use a separate spray bottle and fill it with white vinegar. Mist this lightly over the damp carpet. Keep the vinegar for use another time.
    7. Allow carpet to dry.

    FOR DRY OR OLD URINE.

    1. Mix a solution of one tea spoon powdered laundry detergent (do not use bleach) to one quart of HOT water. Stir until all powder is dissolved. Put solution in a clean spray bottle.
    2. Wet the carpet thoroughly with detergent solution. Lightly brush area with a soft scrub brush.
    3. Blot dry with a dry white cotton towel. Remove as much moisture as possible.
    4. Pour out the remaining hot detergent and rinse spray bottle. Fill spray bottle with hot water. Rinse area and blot dry. Repeat this step at least 3 times.
    5. Wet area with enough white vinegar to saturate the yellow stain. Gently work the vinegar into the pile of the carpet with a soft scrub brush. Brush the nap of the carpet the same direction as the adjoining carpet and let it dry.
    6. After 24 hours inspect the carpet for any remaining yellow stain or odor. Repeat step 5 again if needed. You may repeat this step up to three times if needed.
    7. If the stain or odor remain you may attempt to use an enzyme product(Natures Miracle, Anti Ichi Poo, and many others available at pet stores, and mail order houses). CAUTION: Their are some health risk associated with repeated use of enzymes especially for people with respiratory problems. Also many of the enzyme products being sold to clean up pet stains have a very high pH and will destroy the stain resistant properties of your carpet. Who cares? It's not cleaning up anyway right? Retreat the carpet with 3M "Scotchgard" TM carpet protector when you are compleatly finished.
    8. Rinse carpet with warm water to remove all other cleaning agents before working with enzymes. Enzymes are living organisms and can be killed by certain chemicals.
    9. If their are directions on the bottle follow them if not here is the general method.
      Wet carpet with enzyme solution thoroughly and work solution into the fiber with a soft brush. Allow the enzyme solution to work for at least 24 hours. Be sure to keep the area moist for a 24 hour period by misting with warm water occasionally.
    10. Rinse the carpet with hot water . Use a separate spray bottle and fill it with white vinegar. Mist this lightly over the damp carpet and let it dry.
    11. Inspect carpet after it is dry. If the stain is still visible repeat steps 9 and 10 up to 3 times.

    PERSISTENT ODOR PROBLEMS?
    If you have cleaned the carpet face fibers as described and still have an odor problem it probably not originating from the face fibers. Under the carpet are several layers of potentially odor absorbing material.

    The Carpet Backing-
    Your carpet is glued to a woven backing and sub backing that may be composed of a natural fiber like jute (tan or brown) or a synthetic fiber like action back (white). If you have a carpet with a natural backing it will be much more difficult to rid it of offensive odors. Either way you may treat it the same. Detach carpet from tackless strip and pull up affected area. Apply a DISINFECTANT (Lysol), or an enzyme product, directly to the backing of the carpet. Let the backing dry before it is reinstalled.

    The Pad-
    If the pad is discolored from pet urine cut out the affected area making straight cuts only. Take a portion of the damaged pad to a carpet retailer and buy matching pad to replace the damaged area. Cut out a new piece to the exact size and lay it in place. Tape the new pieces down with 3 inch wide masking tape.

    Sub Flooring-
    It may be concrete, wood, ceramic tile, vinyl, or any other number of surfaces. Concrete and wood are the most common and the most absorbent. Apply a disinfectant (Lysol or Bleach if you are very careful to avoid the carpet) to the affected area. Let it dry. Seal the concrete with any concrete sealer available at hardware stores. Seal wood with polyurethane varnish.

    Reattach the carpet to the tackless strip. You will probably need to hire a professional for this job. It's harder than it looks.

    About the author:
    My name is Mark Brackmann and I own Spotless Carpet Cleaning Inc. a professional carpet cleaning service in Jacksonville, Florida. I have used the methods described above, hundreds of times over the years and have charged my good customers thousands of dollars for this fine service. Many times the same customer will call me back several times a year to handle new problem areas or old areas revisited by the pet. Although it is a welcome addition to my income I am always stuck by how utterly unnecessary it is to clean dog urine from carpet. It is always easier, quicker, cheaper, and certainly more sanitary to teach the dog to pee outside.

    Copyright 1996, this article may be reproduced only in it's entirety, not for profit purposes, and if the author is given credit. The author will not be responsible for any damage that is done, to the carpet or other property. Caution should be exorcised when using any chemicals around pets, or especially children. The author assumes no responsibility for injury, illness or any other loss.

    <<


  • @DebraDownSouth:

    Puppies have accidents when owners don't watch them VERY carefully, and we all blink sometimes :)…

    one of the best lines I've heard in a while! sooooo true too!


  • @DebraDownSouth:

    It is always easier, quicker, cheaper, and certainly more sanitary to teach the dog to pee outside.

    <<

    that is the line i like best!:)


  • I too have flown with a pup in a Sherpa… one thing, be sure that they have a not been fed right before... and also the longer you can keep the pup awake, the more likely they will sleep the entire time. I kept the pup up and playing for at least 3 hours before the flight... and I do mean playing hard.. (I was pretty tired too...)I also did a 5+ hour flight, no accidents. But a friend of mine had a great idea... and it does work, take along some puppy wee/wee pads... you can go into the bathroom, put down the pad on the floor and let the little one go... however with as short of a flight you are doing, I doubt it will be necessary....

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