Diagnose Cairo? I am stumped…

OK so, I am stumped with this. I have a vet visit with the good ole' expensive vet on Wed morning. See if you can diagnose Cairo.

OK, so this is weird. Cairo has what appears to be a paw print on his spine from rough play at the park or claw marks from Savanah (the rescue we were watching). I take a closer look and there are 4 small hairless spots, each in a circular shape. Just dry skin there that I treat with Neosporin and it goes away.

Small like a hive, with zero itchy scratch or any notice of it. No pattern, just one or two on different parts of the back. Just looks like dry skin and in a circle. The size of an eraser.

Didnt see any head, doesnt react like an ant bite. No hard tight skin or swelling. No point for a stinger, or any place that you could determine that there was a pussy head.

So I was assuming it was just that time of year for flakey skin. I thought I was imagining the circular shape. No itchiness, no red skin, just flakey and loss of hair in the spot that the dry skin has been.

Today I come home for lunch. Cairo has one large welp on his side. I can see his hair sticking out differently at one place. I take a look under the skin and see a pussy head. The puss was liquidy, not hard and a watery yellow.

This is not an absess or infected hair that has to be worked out. This feels like a rock under the skin. When the puss is off and cleaned off, the skin is read with vessles at the surface. I put Neosporin on it and it will go away. If I do nothing it would just turn into that flaky skin I have been seeing.

My guess is I have been seeing it after the puss has been relieved. It kinda reminds me of having the chicking pox without the itching. He has about 3 in different places on his back.

This one I found today is about the size of a dime. Once I saw the puss, I made the appt. Anyone have experience with something similar?

Cairo is 9 months on the 15th.
He is fixed.
He has had all of his shots.
He has eaten the same food with no change (Natural balance duck n potato)
He hasnt had any treats for the past month.
He eats out of the same bowl everyday that gets washed.
His bedding is the same, and is washed weekly with the same detergent.
He sleeps with Caesar every night, Caesar has zero symptoms.
Washed weekly after the dog park with a non soap shampoo.
He has had this for 3-4 weeks.
He got this after Savanah was rescued and living with us, but she has no symptoms herself and her hair is all grown in.
He had Advantix a month ago.
He doesnt itch and I have seen zero fleas.
He is indoor all day and outside for regular exercise and potty time.
Welps only appear on his back and are not in just one area.

my guess is ringworm. I would look it up online but that is what is sounds like to me.

😕 I don't know, but I would like to know what the vet tells you. Good luck!!!

My guess is bug bite…mosquito, probably. A couple of my dogs react to mosquito bites this way (actually I do too)...not all mosquitos, but maybe a certain species, or maybe a certain time of year...

I was thinking it might be ringworm also. I would have the vet do a scraping for mites and ringworm (ringworm needs a culture done). A lot of the symptoms you are describing sound like Tyler and Zoey's ringworm. Ringworm can also cause secondary bacterial infections. Ringworm spores from an infected animal can live for months in the environment. Some dogs are more susceptible to it "taking hold" than others. Isn't Cairo still pretty young? I think puppies are more susceptible than older adults.

Well, I think that is the best diagnosis so far. I have moved my appointment date to tonight at 7, so we will know soon. Here is some basic info on Ringworm:

Ringworm
Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

Ringworm is a well known fungus that can infect dogs, cats and humans. Many people have either had or known someone that has had a ringworm infection. There are several different forms of the fungus which can infect either you or your pet. The diagnosis and treatment is fairly straightforward for all species, however, some species affecting dogs can be much more difficult. Every pet owner should be aware of the signs, transmission, and treatment of ringworm.

Where is the fungus found?

Several different fungi found throughout the world can cause ringworm, however, the vast majority of cases in dogs are caused by Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, or Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The ringworm fungus is most prevalent in hot, humid climates, but interestingly enough, most cases of ringworm occur in the fall and winter. The fungus is most commonly found either on or in the living quarters of infected animals. Spores from infected animals can be shed into the environment and live for over 18 months. Most healthy dogs do not carry spores on their skin or hair. The incidence of ringworm infections in dogs is actually quite small. In one study of dogs that had active skin problems, less than 3% had ringworm.

How is ringworm transmitted?

Ringworm can be transmitted by direct contact with an infected animal, or contact with an item that is contaminated with the spores. The spore can be on infected grooming equipment or brushes, in a contaminated boarding facility or kennel, or in the environment where an infected animal has visited. As you can see, because of the spore's ability to survive for long periods in the environment, your dog can contract ringworm just about anywhere other dogs or cats have been. Fortunately, most healthy adult dogs have some resistance to ringworm and never develop symptoms from the fungus. Young dogs are most often infected. Dogs with a suppressed immune system from other diseases or overuse of steroids are also more susceptible to contracting the disease.

What are the signs of ringworm?

Dogs with ringworm often have a very characteristic set of symptoms. The classic symptom is a small round lesion that is devoid of hair. The lesion will often have scaly skin in the center. Small pustules are often found in the lesion. The lesion may start as a small spot and continue to grow in size. The lesion may or may not be irritated and itchy. The lesions are most common on the head but can also occur on the legs, feet, or tail. The condition can often appear like, and be confused with, demodectic mange. In some infections, the fungus will not be in a circle and can spread across the face or nose and look like an autoimmune disease.

How is ringworm diagnosed?

Ringworm can be diagnosed through several different methods. A popular but not completely accurate way to diagnose the disease is through the use of a specialized black light called a Wood's lamp. Several species of the ringworm fungus will glow a fluorescent color when exposed to a Wood's lamp. However, it is estimated that up to half of the most common species of M. canis do not fluoresce under a Wood's lamp, and T. mentagrophytes does not fluoresce. In addition, a healthy animal may have spores on his coat but may not have an active infection.

Another method for identifying ringworm is to pluck and examine hairs on the periphery of the lesion under the microscope using a preparation of KOH (potassium hydroxide solution) to make them more visible. Between 40% and 70% of the infections can be diagnosed this way.

The best and most accurate way to identify a ringworm infection is by collecting scales and crust from the skin and coat and performing a culture. There are special culture mediums designed specifically for identifying ringworm infections. Your local veterinarian can easily perform this routine culture.

So tell me? What treatment did the vet use and what was your impression and their reaction?

Did both catch it from each other.

It said people with poor immune systems can transmit it from their dog! Yikes!

fyi–if they do a culture for ringworm, it will take around 10 days I believe before the results will be in.

@Mantis:

So tell me? What treatment did the vet use and what was your impression and their reaction?

Did both catch it from each other.

It said people with poor immune systems can transmit it from their dog! Yikes!

Max had a very small, mild case when he was about 15, and we just used an antifungal cream for it. Tyler and Zoey were together in a kennel at a shelter for a couple of years before I adopted them. They had the ringworm when I got them, but 3 vets (including 1 dermatologist) all mentioned ringworm but didn't test for it because it is unusual in dogs, and their infections covered such a massive area. The results came back from a skin biopsy I insisted upon when treatment for pyoderma wasn't really improving the situation. They were immediately put on pills (there are different types of antifungal pills–and they're not risk free--I don't have the name with me) and immediately started improving. It can take months of treatment to clear up completely. And yes--it can be spread from animal to animal and animal to people. I never contacted anything from Max, Tyler or Zoey--and they were all sleeping on my bed before I knew they had ringworm. Good luck--let us know how it goes.

@Mantis:

So tell me? What treatment did the vet use and what was your impression and their reaction?

Did both catch it from each other.

It said people with poor immune systems can transmit it from their dog! Yikes!

Mantis, It is easy to catch. I think I remember just an antifungal cream was used. I wish I could remember better, sorry.

i am wondering if he got it from savanah. adult dogs can carry it without symptoms like a virus? will they want to treat savanah and caesar as well, or do I have to see soars….

@Mantis:

i am wondering if he got it from savanah. adult dogs can carry it without symptoms like a virus? will they want to treat savanah and caesar as well, or do I have to see soars….

I believe the spores collect in the hair follicles–so that's different from a virus--but similar idea. The dog doesn't necessarily have the actual fungus spreading. You will probably want to look over Caesar and Savanah from head to toe--but if they don't have any evidence of the fungus--I don't think they will be prescribed pills to take. If it is ringworm, there are things you need to do to clean the environment also--like spray hard surfaces with a bleach/water solution--launder bedding--vacuum, etc.

Ringworm AND I have a really good thing for that. You can buy it in Walmart etc where they have ethnic hair products it's called Sulfa-8. It is a vasoline type product that was used a million years ago by barbers for RINGWORM.

Of course the other remedy is crush a clove of Garlic and rub it in to the spots.

Keeps away witches too - I think 🙂

Well, after aquiring $7k worth of bills from Beta's illness and passing I have learned a few things about vets.

I went to Banfield where Cairo is on the Wellness Plan for his puppy stuff for a year. That means any visits are free.

I showed the vet the new spot, the old spots and she said that without a puss filled head on one she couldnt be sure of anything. Keep in mind that Cairo has only one spot showing. Everything else is tiny and eraser head bald spots arent really impressive on a brindle coat.

So, she wanted to scrape for mites under the skin to test for mange which is common. Also wanted to do a test for ringworm as well.

I have learned the hard way that this means, "I dont know" and "lets try this". So I got a price on the testing and prices on the meds if the tests are positive.

Needless to say, I skipped the tests and took both meds. So I have a spray for fungus (ringworm) and antibiotics for mange. I am using both and we will see if it goes away or not. If not, then we will move a head with the testing.

Spent $46 and $6 on a new stuffed toy for the little man.

We shall see how that does for now.

Ringworm is treated with topical Lamisil or generic. In humans, a nurse-practioner friend told me is a fungal yeast type of infection and not a worm at all. Sorry if that is a repeat of any prior post…

Hope Cairo Feels better soon!

At least he got himself a NEW TOY out of the ordeal. 😃

Mites can be looked at immediately under a scope as soon as the scraping is done, how much could that cost? I think I would have had the scraping done? Why would you want to put stuff on them that they don't need? While I can understand your problem after Beta… but Vets don't know everything.. and I would rather have a "I don't know" then to lead you down a path.... also for skin, IMO a specialist would have been better

@Mantis:

I have learned the hard way that this means, "I dont know" and "lets try this". So I got a price on the testing and prices on the meds if the tests are positive.

Needless to say, I skipped the tests and took both meds. So I have a spray for fungus (ringworm) and antibiotics for mange. I am using both and we will see if it goes away or not. If not, then we will move a head with the testing.

Spent $46 and $6 on a new stuffed toy for the little man.

We shall see how that does for now.

Yes–they really can't get a definitive diagnosis without doing a scraping. If they did the scraping and found mites, they would treat for that. If they don't find mites, then they need to culture for ringworm. That is pretty standard. Skin problems can be difficult to diagnose. Then there's always the possibility that allergies could be involved if it's not mites/ringworm. Per someone's previous post, I would get some antifungal cream at the drugstore, too. What is the spray she gave you? Hope little Cairo's skin clears up soon.

Well, Cairo has finished his fungus spray and has 1 more week of antibiotics to go. His coat looks great so far, and I havent seen any new bumps. Wish him luck!

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