NutriSource Dog Food!
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  • Hello all my Bforum Friends,

    I just got done talking to a friend of mine who sells Nurtisource dog food and i looked at the ingredients and everything looks really good in the food. Was wondering if anyone has had good or bad experiences with this food?

    Is anyone looking to find a distributor of this food (i am contemplating doing it and would be happy to distribute to others if interested)

    Please comment your ideas. Thanks!

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  • We feed this food to a lot of our working dogs and service dogs for kids with disabilities. However, we are quite selective in what we feed; only grain free diets. Nutrisource had a patented probiotic they use in the product that , frankly, we have found to be the best in the business. The dogs also really like the food. At our company, we tend to be dog food nutrition freaks and promote doggy body builder type foods only.Nutrisource grain free products are part of our line-up. We also use a lot of veggies, fruits, and raw food.

    Jeff

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  • According to PetsumerReport.com, NutriSource's dry food contains Sodium Selenite, a "potential risk form of selenium."

    On the good side, the probiotics are listed in the Guaranteed Analysis; i.e., the company guarantees the bacteria is viable, something most manufacturers don't do.

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  • According to PetsumerReport.com, NutriSource's dry food contains Sodium Selenite, a "potential risk form of selenium."

    Actually, that is not exactly correct in the case of the grain free diets that I recommended. I cannot say for their base line foods as we do not use them or recommend them as they contain grain. However, the grain free products that we know very well and do recommend, contain selenium yeast which preliminary studies using placebos and double blind tests show promising results for fighting cancer.

    Sodium selenite was a big product in 70's dog food and there is very good chance nutrisource as well as most other dog food companies used it. It is still used in human foods.

    For any who have an interest in the actual ingredients, I have added them here for the products we use:
    Chicken grain free:

    Chicken, chicken meal, peas, pea starch, pea flour, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), natural flavors, salmon meal (a source of fish oil), tomato pomace, dried egg product, potassium chloride, sunflower oil, brewers yeast, salt, minerals (zinc proteinate, iron proteinate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, cobalt proteinate, selenium yeast), yeast culture (saccharomyces cerevisiae, enterococcus faecium, lactobacillus acidophilus, aspergillus niger, bacillus subtillis), taurine, vitamins (vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, niacin, d-calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement), glucosamine hydrochloride, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), choline chloride, chondroitin sulfate, yucca schidigera extract, calcium iodate, rosemary extract.

    NutriSource? Grain Free Chicken dog food is formulated to meet the nutritional levels established by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) Dog Food Nutrient Profiles for all life stages.

    Lamb grain free:
    Lamb meal, peas, pea starch, pea flour, salmon meal (a source of fish oil), chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), potatoes, tomato pomace, natural flavors, sunflower oil, potassium chloride, brewers yeast, salt, salmon oil, minerals (zinc proteinate, iron proteinate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, cobalt proteinate, selenium yeast), choline chloride, yeast culture (saccharomyces cerevisiae, enterococcus faecium, lactobacillus acidophilus, aspergillus niger, bacillus subtillis), taurine, vitamins (vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, niacin, d-calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement), glucosamine hydrochloride, tryptophan, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), chondroitin sulfate, yucca schidigera extract, calcium iodate, rosemary extract.

    NutriSource? Grain Free Lamb Large Breed dog food is formulated to meet the nutritional levels established by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) Dog Food Nutrient Profiles for all life stages.

    Salmon product:
    Ingredients:
    Salmon, salmon meal (a source of salmon oil), peas, sweet potato, pea flour, pea starch, sunflower oil, alfalfa, flax seed, dicalcium phosphate, potassium chloride, tomato pomace, salt, calcium carbonate, cranberries, minerals (zinc proteinate, iron proteinate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, cobalt proteinate, selenium yeast), choline chloride, blueberries, pea fiber, glucosamine hydrochloride, turmeric, taurine, chicory extract, lecithin, vitamins (vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, niacin, d-calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement), L-tryptophan, garlic, ascorbic acid (source of vitamin C), chondroitin sulfate, yucca schidigera extract, L-carnitine, calcium iodate, rosemary extract, yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product, dried Aspergillus niger fermentation product, dried Bacillus subtillis fermentation product.
    Pure VitaTM Grain Free Salmon Formula dog food is formulated to meet the nutritional levels established by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) Dog Food Nutrient

    The product is also ethoxoquin free according to their head chemist who wrote me personally.

    For those of you interested in selenium yeast:

    Selenium yeast, produced by fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a selenium-rich media, is a recognized source of organic food-form selenium.[1] In this process, virtually all of the selenium structurally substitutes for sulfur in the amino acid methionine thus forming selenomethionine via the same pathways and enzymes that are used to form sulfur-containing methionine. Owing to its similarity to S-containing methionine, selenomethionine is taken up nonspecifically and becomes part of yeast protein. It is this metabolic route that makes selenium yeast valuable in animal and human nutrition, since it offers the same organic form of selenium produced by food-chain autotrophs (i.e., most plants and certain blue-green algae).[2][3]

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  • As we all know here, what we feed is most times "very close to the heart"… It is good to see all the different options as we decide on the best for our own Basenjis. To me, as long as you are feeding good quality, be it kibble, raw, mix of both, whatever... it becomes very personal.

    My personal preference is grain free, especially no corn or beet pulp, as I consider them fillers. Corn generates heat, great for cattle or horses in the winter, not so great for dogs, IMO....

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  • thanks everyone for the replies. I appreciate the input. Alot of useful info. I like the food and prefer the grain free too..I agree with you Kathy, corn and beet pulp are just fillers. They make them seem full without providing the essential nutrients that they need. it just fills them up. but i think the nutrosource seems like a really good food. just seeing if anyone else thought that way too :P

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  • I have also had good results with the food- I switched 2 years ago when Jibini got a stomach upset that seemed to be linked to Blue Buffalo and a minor formula change. It's the best food I can get without having to drive all the way to Mitchell and thankfully it worked out well for my pups! (They sell it at Runnings in Parkston.)

    They only recently started selling the grain-free variety there as well; in fact I just bought a bag. Made me happy to find it, since Tana is the only one who just doesn't seem to handle "normal" food formulas and I was still getting her grain free TOTW in Mitchell when she needed it, (and rotating her onto a raw diet every couple of months). Up until now I was feeding the other dogs the regular adult maintenance and Ellie (Brittany hunting dog) was on the 20/30 performance food when we bred her (didn't take) and I kept her on it since pheasant season started right after we confirmed she wasn't pregnant :).

    Earlier this year we had 9 very nice French imported hunting dogs (including my dog's sire) from a well-known breeder staying at the kennel where I work; the owners use Nutrisource and all of their dogs were in excellent condition as well. Excellent muscle, beautiful coats, nice shiny eyes, compact poops, lol. I definitely think it's a decent quality food, especially for us rural folks who don't have much to choose from. I can definitely say it's the best available food in my area, unless I want to go all the way to Mitchell.

    The only other "local" food I'd consider if I had no other choice, is the Native Performance line of foods put out by Kent animal feeds, but I kinda think the Kent dealer in my town is a bit of a jackass, LOL…..suits me just fine to go ahead and drive the 30 miles to Runnings :)

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  • First Basenji's

    Hey Jeff,

    Thanks for the information, and PS: really enjoyed your website. All the pictures of all the dogs, but of course the ones of the Basenjis being used as they are from your litters, OUTSTANDING WORK! Wish I lived closer!

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