3 most aggressive breeds, new study

A new study is out that describes the three most "aggressive" breeds. Interesting! 🙂

Most Aggressive Breeds

The top 3 most aggressive dog breeds
Attention, America, or at least all you state and local politicians who are banning or considering banning ownership of pit bulls, Rottweilers and other big, scary dogs: In the midst of your rush to pass breed specific legislation, a new study has shown that the most aggressive dog breed in the world is …

Yes, the dachshund, the weiner dog, better known in some countries as the sausage dog.

This vicious beast, despite enjoying a good reputation, is at the very top of a list of 33 dog breeds that were rated for their aggression in a study that analyzed the behavior of thousands of dogs.

One in five dachshunds have bitten or tried to bite strangers; about one in five have attacked other dogs, and one in 12 have snapped at their owners, according to the study, which was reported in the London Telegraph.

Before all you dachshund owners start experiencing the same fears as pit bull owners, and begin contemplating how to hide your pet from authorities (a large bun, perhaps?), it should be pointed out that, as a small dog, a dachshund won't inflict the same amount of damage as a large one, or the same amount of headlines.

So you're probably safe. Now that we're all relaxed we can move on to No. 2 on the most aggressive list .... German Shepherd, maybe? Perhaps the Chow Chow, or Doberman.

Nope. It's the chihuahua. Look out, Paris Hilton.

Chihuahuas, even smaller than dachshunds, and the fashion accessory of choice for Paris Hilton and other celebrities, were the second most hostile breed.

According to the study, they are fairly regularly snapping or attempting to bite strangers, family and other dogs.

In third place was another small dog ... the breed that captured our heart in the television show, Frazier -- the Jack Russell terrier. The study shows beyond any doubt: Small dogs are not to be trusted.

Just kidding, of course. But that is precisely the sort of generalization those passing laws against pit bulls are making. (Then again, they are probably small politicians, who really can't be trusted.)

There may, however, actually be some basis behind my theory that small dogs often display a bit of a Napolean complex -- at least judging from the number that yap and snap at my big dog.

Dr. James Serpell, a University of Pennsylvania researcher who worked on the study, said smaller breeds might be more genetically predisposed towards aggressive behavior than larger dogs.

"Reported levels of aggression in some cases are concerning, with rates of bites or bite attempts rising as high as 20 per cent toward strangers and 30 per cent toward unfamiliar dogs," he added.

Most research into canine aggression up to now has focused on dog bites, but researchers said that data (pit bulls aren't at the top of that list either) is misleading. Most dog bites aren't reported, and because the bites of big dogs are more likely to get reported, they are generally viewed as more aggressive.

The study, published this week in the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science, involved researchers from the University of Pennsylvania questioning 6,000 dog owners. Breeds scoring low for aggression included Basset hounds, golden retrievers, labradors, Siberian huskies. The rottweiler, pit bull and Rhodesian ridgeback scored average or below average marks for hostility towards strangers. Greyhounds rated the most docile.

The study also showed that "temperament testing" isn't all it's cracked up to be.

Owners of 67 dogs temperament tested and subsequently adopted from one shelter were interviewed by telephone within 13 months of adoption. The interviews included questions about jumping up, house soiling, separation-related behavior, barking and aggressive behavior.

In evaluating dogs that passed the temperament test used by the shelter, it was found that 40.9% exhibited lunging, growling, snapping, and/or biting after adoption. When barking was included, this percentage rose to 71.2%.

"Our results indicated that there are certain types of aggressive tendencies (territorial, predatory, and intra-specific aggression) that are not reliably exhibited during temperament testing using this particular evaluation process," the researchers said The researchers said temperament tests often fail to identify certain types of aggression.

(Photos by Associated Press)

Sharron,

I saw that news item today, and wasn't suprised in the least. When I worked as a veterinary assistant I was almost bitten by min pins many many times, snapped at by multiple chihuahuas and one deaf and blind miniature schnauzer (I didn't fault that old guy, he was so confused and afraid all the time, who could blame him). The only big dogs that ever made a move on me was a Chow-chow and a horribly abused boxer.

I also believe that Daschunds might often be in pain when even their owners don't realize it, and that can make them snappier than other dogs (but it's just a suspicion)

At any rate it was the little ones that always gave me trouble. Go figure.

Randa

Funny that this was posted today. Because this was in our local news today -

"Dachshund Eats Owner's Big Toe ALTON, ILL. –A 56-year old woman says her miniature dachshund, Roscoe, gnawed off her right big toe while she was asleep.

Linda Floyd says she has no feeling in her toes because of nerve damage from diabetes.

She discovered the toe missing after waking from a nap Monday.

She called her daughter, who phoned 911.

Hospital officicials say not only did Roscoe chewed off the toe and part of the toe joint, he also severed an artery.

A veterinarian says the toe had been bandaged because of a healing hangnail.

That might have somehow attracted the dog.

Roscoe was euthanized because of safety concerns."

I find little dogs more dangerous than the larger, or PIT bull type…but we don't live in an area that would support any type of pit fighting.

I always stand up for pitt bulls when people say they attack people or are aggressive, etc. They get their bad reputation because they are built like a bull, thus very strong & can handle a lot of beating, so used to fight. When raised to be a fighter they can seriously kill someone because of how strong they are. However, they are not a naturally aggressive breed. Chows on the other hand…they scare me.

Funny thing too. I have always said weiner dogs were evil & people make fun of me for it. Ever since my baby sitters stupid wire haired wiener dog attacked me when I was 7...shudder I have not trusted one. That dog had mroe aggression than any dog I have EVER seen...may it rest in hell. Muwhahaha.

I think there are aggressive dogs in all breeds, usually due to poor breeding, poor socialization, and/or medical issues. Personally, I love Doxie's… if it was not for the grooming on the Long Hairs and/or wires, I would have one (or two)... like any breed they are great when bred properly, socialized and do not have medical issues.. (they mostly have back problems for obvious reasons).
Toy dogs I do find as the most aggressive... "big dog" complex.. IMO... but again, breeding and socialization goes a long way... and also, again IMO, people do not treat their dogs as a dog (with the dress up, carrying them all the time, treating them like something breakable) adds to the attitude they get....

There are good dog and bad dogs of every shape, size, and breed. There are three key ingredients to a good dog. The more you get of these key ingredients the better your chances of having a fantastic dog. The ingredients are good breeding, good early socialization, and continuing training for life. One of the reasons little dogs can be such a problem is that people shelter them so much they don't get good early socialization and then they follow that by not training them because they think it is unneccessary. Pretty quickly you have a terror on your hands.

Most of the shelter dogs that pass their temperament test have obvious behavior issues that are usually pretty easy to correct with some very basic training. The most common issues are jumping up and pulling on the leash with the big dogs. With the small dogs it is escaping and constant barking. These are all preventable problems and are way easier to keep from becoming a habit than they are to break but most people expect a dog to come with "software fully loaded". They don't seem to realize that dogs need direction, they need to know what is the right thing to do and what is not. They need feedback just like we do. That is why I love clicker training, it is so easy to give my dog positive feedback when it is doing something right. And it works, I get to see it work on all sorts of dogs from all sorts of backgrounds at the shelter. It is such a powerful tool. And yet so hard to convince people that if you let the dog know when it is right and reward that, they will choose to do what is right.

@tanza:

I think there are aggressive dogs in all breeds, usually due to poor breeding, poor socialization, and/or medical issues. Personally, I love Doxie's… if it was not for the grooming on the Long Hairs and/or wires, I would have one (or two)... like any breed they are great when bred properly, socialized and do not have medical issues.. (they mostly have back problems for obvious reasons).
Toy dogs I do find as the most aggressive... "big dog" complex.. IMO... but again, breeding and socialization goes a long way... and also, again IMO, people do not treat their dogs as a dog (with the dress up, carrying them all the time, treating them like something breakable) adds to the attitude they get....

Agree. And I don't mean to pick on Doxies 🙂 That dog just left a scare on me! Haha. It's scary to be a 7 year old & this little weiner dog is attacking your leg like it's a chicken leg or something. Haha.

However, I agree with Tanza & lVoss that it is all how the dog is properly bred & socialized. If you are aggressive to any breed they will probably become more aggressive. I have met some very nice doxies, chiuauas, pitts, rotis, etc. It's all how they are brought up. A lot like children I think.

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