Why OFA?

Why are Basenji's OFA'd? They don't seem like a likely candidate for hip displasia. I'm just curious. Does it also check for luxating patellas?

For many, many years it was believed that the small frame and build of Basenjis made them free of hip dysplasia. But then a few cases were found. Breeders are now routinely x-raying breeding animals to help make sure that HD does not become a problem in the breed.

Luxating patellas (slipping kneecaps) are not associated with HD. Patellas are checked by your veterinarian using a simple manipulation process. My vet checks patellas for free as part of any routine visit. You can get an OFA number for clear patellas by having your vet fill out the proper forms.

@dash:

Why are Basenji's OFA'd? They don't seem like a likely candidate for hip displasia. I'm just curious. Does it also check for luxating patellas?

While they might not "look the role" there have been cases of HD and particularly in certain bloodlines, enough that it is important to get a handle on this and test all Basenjis before breeding and as many of the offspring that we can.

As Robyn said, luxation patellas are done by your local Vet. And again, should be as we have seen this as a problem in Basenjis also…

You can request elbows and knees (separate) as part of the OFA evaluation if you wish.

Yes, there is definitely HD in our breed. So, yes breeders should absolutely be screening for it. OFA reports that there has been an increase in percentage of effected basenjis over the last 20 years. Part of that is because more basenjis are being screened, but IMO, it is definintely on the rise in our breed. The difficult part is a severely dysplastic dog can still move beautifully, until they age and start to have arthritis settling into their joints. The good part is that basenjis ARE built well to withstand HD, because they are light, well balanced, and can easily be kept in good muscle tone. That being said, breeders should be aware of it, and careful in their breeding plans to avoid it.

Well said Andrea…. as they say, if you don't test you don't know....

@YodelDogs:

For many, many years it was believed that the small frame and build of Basenjis made them free of hip dysplasia. But then a few cases were found. Breeders are now routinely x-raying breeding animals to help make sure that HD does not become a problem in the breed.

Luxating patellas (slipping kneecaps) are not associated with HD. Patellas are checked by your veterinarian using a simple manipulation process. My vet checks patellas for free as part of any routine visit. You can get an OFA number for clear patellas by having your vet fill out the proper forms.

The only thing I would add here is there are WAY more than a few cases….even the most active, knowledgeable breeders may only HEAR about a few cases....but there are way more out there that either haven't been diagnosed or announced.

@Quercus:

The only thing I would add here is there are WAY more than a few cases….even the most active, knowledgeable breeders may only HEAR about a few cases....but there are way more out there that either haven't been diagnosed or announced.

Exactly… and I know of 3 such that the results have never been released as public OFA records...

@Quercus:

The only thing I would add here is there are WAY more than a few cases….even the most active, knowledgeable breeders may only HEAR about a few cases....but there are way more out there that either haven't been diagnosed or announced.

What I meant to say was, a few cases being announced is what encouraged breeders to start x-raying.

@YodelDogs:

What I meant to say was, a few cases being announced is what encouraged breeders to start x-raying.

True, but too bad it is not encouraging them to make the results public…. if a problem...

A long time ago I was at a seminar put on by the Senior Conformation Dog Show Judges. When we were on the structure section, something that was said really resonated with me. The example they gave was 2 dogs 2 different breedings that you are considering for a stud dog. Both have many sterling qualities one has Fair hips and one has Good hips - who do you use. Most everyone said Good hips. However then we got the rest of this information. The Fair dog was the only Fair in a litter of Good. The Good dog was the only Good in a litter of Fair/Poor. With that additional information - the Fair dog is actually the best choice.

Too many times we are making breeding decisions based on incomplete information. I reimburse my pet people who get thier dogs OFA'd but they still seldom do. 😞

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