Bladder cancer in basenji

I have 15 yr old female that after having what we thought was reoccuring bladder infections the vet did a rectal/pelvic exam and says she feels a mass or tumor. Right now she is peeing straight blood. Vet did a uranialys and gave an rx for antibodics. We have an ultrasound scheduled for Tues. next week to confirm the tumor diagonsis. My question is the vet is recomending that b/c of her age and she already has some kidney problems that we don't do chemo but do a treatment with an NASID that would make her feel better. I've done some reading and I guess this is the current treatment option b/c it keeps the tumor from getting bigger. Wondering if anyone knows of anything better to do. She is still eating and drinking water well. Just lethargic.

Sorry to hear, hope for better results from the ultrasound. IMO, chemo will only most likely buy you and few extra months and while "they say" chemo on dogs is not like it is with humans, it is still stressful, back and forth to the Vet, treatment, etc. I agree with your Vet's suggestion. Enjoy the time you have with her, make her feel as well as you can.. that is what I would do.

What NSAID does the vet want to give her?

Jennifer

We tried chemo on our 12 yr old female who had liver cancer, unfortunatley she died less than a week after the treatment in horrible sudden pain. I would go the NSAID route if I had to do it again.

@dcmclcm4:

What NSAID does the vet want to give her?

Jennifer

I believe it is peroxicam (sp?)

At that age, I think treatment is almost cruel when there is little chance of a "cure" and long life. ((hugs)) No one can decide except you but I'd go with the vet's suggestion.

piroxicam

http://www.vet.purdue.edu/pcop/files/docs/CanineUrinaryBladderCancer.pdf
The vast majority of TCC cases are treated with medical therapy, i.e. with drugs. Two different drug protocols are used most often in the standard care for dogs with TCC. The first treatment protocol is to give a drug called piroxicam, or a piroxicam- like drug by itself. Piroxicam is a type of drug called a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug or “NSAID”. NSAIDs block the cyclooxygenase (cox) enzyme, and are also referred to as “cox inhibitors”. Cox inhibitors include piroxicam, aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, Previcox, Deramaxx, Rimadyl, and others. There is an interesting history behind the use of cox inhibitors for the treatment of TCC in dogs. Veterinarians in the Purdue Comparative Oncology Program became interested in piroxicam several years ago when it was being used for pain relief in dogs with cancer, and unexpected remissions were noted. Two of the first dogs treated (one with metastatic carcinoma, one with undifferentiated sarcoma) had advanced cancer, and these dogs had remission of their cancer when receiving piroxicam, but no other treatment. This has led to numerous studies of piroxicam in animals with cancer at Purdue. In 62 dogs with TCC treated with piroxicam, the tumor went into complete remission in 2 dogs, decreased in size by > 50% in 9 dogs, remained "stable" in size (<50% change) in 35 dogs, and increased in size by > 50% in 16 dogs. The median (“average”) survival was 195 days.

I have used the NSAIDs Metacam and Previcox and have also used Tramadol for pain in my dogs. I hope all goes well for her.

Jennifer

@DebraDownSouth:

At that age, I think treatment is almost cruel when there is little chance of a "cure" and long life. ((hugs)) No one can decide except you but I'd go with the vet's suggestion.

piroxicam

http://www.vet.purdue.edu/pcop/files/docs/CanineUrinaryBladderCancer.pdf
The vast majority of TCC cases are treated with medical therapy, i.e. with drugs. Two different drug protocols are used most often in the standard care for dogs with TCC. The first treatment protocol is to give a drug called piroxicam, or a piroxicam- like drug by itself. Piroxicam is a type of drug called a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug or “NSAID”. NSAIDs block the cyclooxygenase (cox) enzyme, and are also referred to as “cox inhibitors”. Cox inhibitors include piroxicam, aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, Previcox, Deramaxx, Rimadyl, and others. There is an interesting history behind the use of cox inhibitors for the treatment of TCC in dogs. Veterinarians in the Purdue Comparative Oncology Program became interested in piroxicam several years ago when it was being used for pain relief in dogs with cancer, and unexpected remissions were noted. Two of the first dogs treated (one with metastatic carcinoma, one with undifferentiated sarcoma) had advanced cancer, and these dogs had remission of their cancer when receiving piroxicam, but no other treatment. This has led to numerous studies of piroxicam in animals with cancer at Purdue. In 62 dogs with TCC treated with piroxicam, the tumor went into complete remission in 2 dogs, decreased in size by > 50% in 9 dogs, remained "stable" in size (<50% change) in 35 dogs, and increased in size by > 50% in 16 dogs. The median (“average”) survival was 195 days.

Debra, Thanks for the info. I guess I am not really looking for "treatment" per se, just want to make her as comfortable as possible for as long as I have her. If the NSAID can do that I will be happy. My vet and I have already said we would not take the more aggressive chemo route due to her age and other health factors.

GenJMar…I'm sorry for what you are dealing with and hope that you find a way to make her as comfortable as you can. I hope you have the best possible memories with her for as long as she's here. Best of luck

Update, Aurora had her ultrasound today. Results were about what we expected. TCC cancer in her uretha but also found a large tumor in her spleen unrelated to the bladder cancer. Test result have been sent to our regular vet, but the radiological vet said it would not be much longer before she would not be able to pass urine. He commented that she could be catherized. Just wondering has anyone ever heard of long term catherization of a dog with this condition? It doesn't see feasible to me not to mention the daily care, and pain and discomfort for the dog.

I think that long term-it's not a realistic expectation for quality of life in a fifteen year old dog. While my statement may seem like a blunt opinion, I just want you to know its ultimately what you decide is best for her and you. Each case is different..and I don't want to deter you or make you feel guilty if you do choose that route…I have experience in the patient catheterization ( being in the home health industry)..and know its not an easy upkeep. Idk in dogs but in humans te risk of wrong a UTI increases with catheterization and to me that seems like it would cause her undue pain?? Whatever you decide, we are all here for you and your family...it's a tough decision and you will make the right one.

Talked to my vet and we are going the piroxcam route, but this drug is know to cause stomach ulcers so there will be another drug to help ward off that. Both these drugs have to be specially compounded. Luckily there is a compounding pharmacy in our city so they should be ready tomorrow. Vet says this Rx should give her 6 more months of quality life. Thank you everyone for your understanding and support.

We're all here for you GenJMar…so glad you've found a route you and your vet agree is the right thing... Wishing you all the best in the time you have with her, take lots of pictures...smile a ton and take the time you can with her.

I had thought about doing this for a while, but now I know I am going to take lots of pictures of her and I am planning on getting a tattoo of her with her name. I already have several tattoos for other "life" events So I am thinking a good head or profile of her with her name tattoo on my hip. She has some of the best facial expressions. Now to find an artist to do the drawing from the photo.

I am certain she is as lucky to have you in her life as you are her ((hugs and support))

Update on Aurora. We've been on the meds for almost a week now and she is no longer peeing blood and seems to have a little more eneregy. She is eating well and taking her pills with no fuss. I hide most of them in her soft dog food for breakfast and the others she gets in little pieces of cheese. She is very confused and unsteady first thing in the morning having almost no coordination, but I'm going to chalk that up to old age and her arthritis. After about 30 min. she is good to go. It seems to take her a while to fully wake up. I am trying to enjoy every min. I have with her. I have next Monday off and hubby is out of town, so I'm looking forward to some good quality time with her.

Glad to hear that she is comfortable and doing better! Great news.

So happy to hear you'll have a whole girls day between yourselves.,.glad things are going well!!

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