Hoarding

While I have no issue with an attempt to rehabilitate and/or heal an animal, shouldn't the end result be to be able to place that animal once healed or rehabilitated.

Maybe others who have read the posts in regard to this are more polite than I am or just do not want to step forward and say what I am about to say here, but I can promise you I am not the only one thinking what I am about to post.

I think its appropriate to post this link in regard to similar behavior by others who have been observed showing the appearance of collecting animals.

http://www.recordonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061112/NEWS/611120349

I am aware that my posts are not terribly popular, but I am not on this forum to be popular. While it may be a wonderful thing for people in this forum to pull together and donate money to save a dog or transport it, the fact that the person that wanted this dog transported, could not afford to do it on her own. I would think the inability to financially provide the necessary transportation on her own, would have raised a BIG RED FLAG in regard to escalating the monthly expenses in regard to providing care for this and the other animals involved.

If you consider that your personal dog at the least would cost you $500-$1000 per year (which I think might be a low estimate), multiply this by 9. I think many will agree that $4500-$9000 per year is quite a chunk out of anyone's income. Not to mention other expenses like major surgeries and property maintenance and upkeep. I really think the $500-$1000 cost per year is really low so I did a quick Google search on the internet and I would encourage everyone to click on the link below and read this article on the cost of a dog. I think you will find it eye opening.

I do not expect you to agree with everything in the article just as I do not expect you to agree with everything I am stating in my post. Please scroll toward the bottom of the link to see the estimated costs of owning a dog.

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+1671&aid=1543

Jason

There is a big difference between 8, or 10 or even 20 well cared for dogs, and the animals that overwhelm the home and resources of a true hoarder. The standard of care, not the number of animals is the tipping point.

According to The Hoarding of Animals Research Consortium, the following criteria are used to define animal hoarding:

  • More than the typical number of companion aniamls
  • Inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter, and veterinary care, with this neglect often resulting in starvation, illness, and death
  • Denial of the inability to provide this minimum care and the impact of that failure on the animals, the household, and human occupants of the dwelling

The thyroid meds, vet appointments, vet help with Dallas, surgery on Rocky's neck, etc. all clearly negate the second and third criterion.

I'm not here to hijack this thread or to get into an argument with anyone, so I will not say any more here, but just in case anyone here has to deal with a true hoarder, please spend some time at http://www.tufts.edu/vet/cfa/hoarding/index.html , especially in the Intervention section.

-Nicole

@nkjvcjs:

There is a big difference between 8, or 10 or even 20 well cared for dogs, and the animals that overwhelm the home and resources of a true hoarder. The standard of care, not the number of animals is the tipping point.

According to The Hoarding of Animals Research Consortium, the following criteria are used to define animal hoarding:

  • More than the typical number of companion aniamls
  • Inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter, and veterinary care, with this neglect often resulting in starvation, illness, and death
  • Denial of the inability to provide this minimum care and the impact of that failure on the animals, the household, and human occupants of the dwelling

The thyroid meds, vet appointments, vet help with Dallas, surgery on Rocky's neck, etc. all clearly negate the second and third criterion.

I'm not here to hijack this thread or to get into an argument with anyone, so I will not say any more here, but just in case anyone here has to deal with a true hoarder, please spend some time at http://www.tufts.edu/vet/cfa/hoarding/index.html , especially in the Intervention section.

-Nicole

Nicole, may I suggest to you that there are volumes of information on the net in regard to hoarding. The animals also do not have to be suffering for a person to be considered a hoarder or meet all of the tests either.

I posted links instead of other characteristics and tests, but there are several tests in different articles published on the net that I did post a link for where those tests and/or characteristics have been met.

Let me know if you want me to post a list of articles that will illustrate it clearly that you can read personally. The information below is from the same article you found yourself. Much more there than what you quoted.

This is right from the link below in the FAQ's

http://www.tufts.edu/vet/cfa/hoarding/hoardqa_dt.htm

"Q2:
What are the demographics of animal hoarding?

A2:
The stereotype of an animal hoarder is that of a single, older woman, living alone and socioeconomically disadvantaged. Like any stereotype, there is some support in existing data. However, it is important to recognize that hoarding knows no age, gender, or socioeconomic boundaries. It has been observed in men and women, young and old, married as well as never married or widowed, and in people with professional or white collar jobs. There have even been hoarders among human health professionals and veterinarians and veterinary technicians who manage to live a double life, deceiving friends and co-workers about the true conditions at home"

Jason

I would suggest that animal hoarding has more than one level and more than one stage involved. In fact Illinois is the only state with a legal definition of what animal hoarding is.

With that said, here are some more thoughts on Animal Hoarding taken from the article post at the link below on the web:

http://petcare.suite101.com/article.cfm/animal_hoarding_a_mental_illness

"Animal Hoarding Linked to Mental Illness

According to the Hoarding of Animals Research Consortium (HARC) Intervention Manual, animal hoarders suffer from a range of mental illnesses, including:

  • obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • obsessive-compulsive personality disorder
  • dementia

It should be stressed that animal hoarding is not a legitimate effort to rescue or shelter homeless animals. Pet hoarding is a means of collecting and controlling large numbers of animals and focuses on the person's need to accumulate these animals rather than on the physical or health care needs of these pets."

Read more: http://petcare.suite101.com/article.cfm/animal_hoarding_a_mental_illness#ixzz0XICe5xOP

Jason

Let me get this straight. Ceasar Milan, with a true pack of What? 15-20 in one small area by the way, is not? There are hoarders all over the place. I know a bunch of breeders with 15-20 dogs in their small homes in crates for most of the time. Are they hoarders? (Probably yes, because they don't look for homes for the dogs, they wait for the homes to come to them).
I guess, according to all the scriptures on hoarders here, I am a hoarder too. I have a messed up boxer, an old heeler x on her last legs, and three B's. The boxer and the heeler x will probably live another, maybe, two years. All of my dogs get vet care when needed. But, if I worm my own dogs and not buy the vet stuff that costs an arm and a leg, my dogs aren't being taken care of?

Enough said on hoarders, Cesar Milan (whom none of you know personally, so you can't take what he says about his background as gospel. Remember there are three sides to every story. His, someone else who knows him personally and the truth, which would probably lie somewhere in the middle.)

Just one more question here, should we class PETA, and humane society's (no kill shelter's especially) as hoarders as well?

Thread is closed.

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