Sad

I hope I put this in the correct place. At the dog show Saturday there was a man with a pretty tri beside me I ask how old he said 3 maybe not sure. The tri hardly put his paw on the man's slacks and he kicked the dog back told him get off. Now this dog had been so good just standing there not jumping or pulling nothing. I ask him is this your dog he looked at me mean and said just showing him and maybe his last if he pees in the ring again. I am sorry but the way he was I wish the dog had sh– on his shoe.
Why do people let other people take there dog this guy has no life he may as well be in a kill shelter. I was so sad for this little tri I could have hit that man. No the dog did not pee in the ring I wish he had then maybe he would have taken him home. That tri got in ring and showed I do not know what that man's problem was but he does not need to show dogs or even be around them.

Rita Jean

Houston

I agree with you, Rita. That is very sad to hear of a professional dog handler behaving like that..I don't know the show world, but regardless, that behaviour does not sound Ok.

Karma is a b**ch sometimes….He'll get his....

Was the tri a dog or bitch…and do you know the name of the tri? What class was it entered in or was did it only go in for Best of Breed. Just curious.

I am sure it was a male cause he said if "he" peeed in ring one more time. Sorry do not know name I am still very stupid as to what all is going on. This was only our 2nd time. I do know it did not make Best of Breed and I think wait answer maybe more in min I think my husband got it on video going to go play it and see what I can be back.

Rita Jean

Sorry did not get the dog just man's face. Any way just sad to see.

Rita Jean

@Rita:

I am sure it was a male cause he said if "he" peeed in ring one more time. Sorry do not know name I am still very stupid as to what all is going on. This was only our 2nd time. I do know it did not make Best of Breed and I think wait answer maybe more in min I think my husband got it on video going to go play it and see what I can be back.

Rita Jean

Sorry did not get the dog just man's face. Any way just sad to see.

Rita Jean

What show was it that you went to?

Springfiield, Missouri was Ozarks Kennel Club, Inc

Rita Jean

Here in the UK we get a catalogue at the show which has a list of all exhibitors at the back and the dogs are listed in their classes, therefore, it's pretty simple to identify a dog and hopefully it's owner. I would hope something similar happens in the US and that maybe someone can find out who this awful individual is.

Theresa

Unfortunately, many show people are like this. I've seen it with horses too. If it's not the owner showing the animal, there is no emotional stake in it. Sometimes, even more reprehensibly, it is the owner. In these cases, the animals are not pets who happen to show. They are investment capital that have to win shows so their puppies, kittens, foals, etc are more valuable. I don't normally frequent the show parts of this forum because I have seen this back-stage behavior and don't like to be reminded of it.

I'm not accusing anyone here of treating their animals this way, but we all know some people do.

AJ's situation was similar. He's not show quality because of his bite. There were show quality dogs in his household and as a result, he became the "red-headed stepchild." It makes me sad when people value one dog over another simply because it can make them more prestige or more money.

Some people are rough on their dogs like this guy. I've seen people walking their dogs constantly yanking up on the leash, sometimes in anger because the dog won't walk perfectly at their side. Poor thing never even gets to stop and smell.

You are correct there is a show book but I did not purchase it but when the show closes in a few days go online and see who all was there were they came from. I still may not know what dog it was. I should have said something I will next time hope there is not a next time.
Belinda, your so right in so many cases if animal not yours do as like but with that having been said sometimes people are still not good even with there own dogs. Some people looked at us rather different when Eli and Jaycee came out of ring I kissed Eli on check and told him he did great then I kissed Jaycee on top of the head and told her the same.
All of our dogs are the same and we love them the same. Jaycee making more money that's funny she is costing us money but that is our choice. Prestige I get that when I am rich looks like that's never gonna happen LOL.

Rita Jean

I do occasionally walk AJ "show style" with the collar high on his neck and a taut leash….but that's when he's trying to pick trash up off the ground or when he's trying to go after another dog. But I don't yank up on it. I just hold his head up.

AJ's Human…while you might have seen it in the horse world, for the year I've been going to shows, I HAVEN'T seen it once. So to say that "many show people are like this" IMHO is a gross generalization...when was the last time you went to a dog show?

In fact, I have seen quite the opposite - professional handlers doting on the dogs they show. The breeders & professional handlers I've met, treat their dogs (or the dogs they show) the same way loving pets are treated.

The only story I have heard about a breeder mishandling their dog after it was shown was written up by the AKC rep that was ringside - I think they were put on some sort of probation.

"Many" means different things to different people. Perhaps I should have said "too many" instead. IMO, 1 person treating any animal like this is too many.

I have seen it in kennels and (with horses) at shows away from the ring. Nickels in a sock comes immediately to mind.

If everyone with show animals and kennels were as loving with the animals as we would like them to be, perhaps the "imperfect" ones wouldn't end up in rescue so much.

I would have to agree with Renault on this one. We have been attending quite a few dog shows in the last year. While Jason photographs, I have nothing to do but watch. I do a lot of people watching, as well as dog watching. Almost all the interactions I see are quite good. I've not seen anything objectionable, really, except for very occasionally people not paying close attention to the dog on the other end of the lead (while they are waiting to go in the ring.) The professional handlers I have met have been quite nice, to the dogs and the people they meet.

I can tell you Jason has a wonderful picture of Erin Roberts and Blade, (actually he has several good ones) where you can clearly see the adoration they have for one another, both dog and human. You can look them up they are a very well known team and I've seen them on tv several times on the televised dog shows. They are really something to see, but honestly, that is what I saw from most people at the shows we went to, of course they were all in the midwest, maybe it is different elsewhere, but it is definitely not accurate to say a "lot" of show people are that way. None of the ones I've met or observed have been.

Miranda

@nobarkus:

Some people are rough on their dogs like this guy. I've seen people walking their dogs constantly yanking up on the leash, sometimes in anger because the dog won't walk perfectly at their side. Poor thing never even gets to stop and smell.

I can say that at a show, when the dog is on the show lead, you will not see handles (be them hired professional or owners that show their own dogs) let them stop and smell…. That is what makes the difference to the dog.. the show lead, they behave one way on that lead then they do on a walking lead or flexi... and that goes for any dog that I show...
My dogs are my pets first, but in the show ring (or getting ready to show) they are expected to act different and behave... not that they always read that book...

And Rita Jean, if it really bothered you that much, you should have looked up who the dog was and the owner, if you remember the arm band number you can find out when the catalog is on line who the dog was.. and you don't always have to buy the catalog, you could ask someone that is around the ring that see with one to take a quick peek and also at the secretary table where you get your armband number, typically they have one you can look at. And it this was a professional handler and his handling bothered you, contact the owner of the dog... if this is his/her typical nature, not going to do much good to say anything.

However to AJ's Human that said, I also totally agree with Renault on this this is not something that "normal" for the show ring (and I showed horses for 25yrs before go to showing dogs)...

@tanza:

I can say that at a show, when the dog is on the show lead, you will not see handles (be them hired professional or owners that show their own dogs) let them stop and smell…. That is what makes the difference to the dog.. the show lead, they behave one way on that lead then they do on a walking lead or flexi... and that goes for any dog that I show...
My dogs are my pets first, but in the show ring (or getting ready to show) they are expected to act different and behave... not that they always read that book...

That said there is no excuse for mistreating a dog, any dog....

And Rita Jean, if it really bothered you that much, you should have looked up who the dog was and the owner, if you remember the arm band number you can find out when the catalog is on line who the dog was.. and you don't always have to buy the catalog, you could ask someone that is around the ring that see with one to take a quick peek and also at the secretary table where you get your armband number, typically they have one you can look at. And it this was a professional handler and his handling bothered you, contact the owner of the dog... if this is his/her typical nature, not going to do much good to say anything.

Correct, in the ring I can perfectly understand. These are just middle class people taking their dog on a walk on the street. It's not just a slight correction. It's a constant anger jerk.

@nobarkus:

Correct, in the ring I can perfectly understand. These are just middle class people taking their dog on a walk on the street. It's not just a slight correction. It's a constant anger jerk.

Yes that is true, but we were talking about show dogs… and sometimes people who do not show get the wrong impression about handlers, professional or owner handled

Pat while you maybe correct as what I could have done or should have done I was not sure as what to do. My son also seen this ask me if what he did was correct? We talked that over but anyway I was not sure what to do. Do I make someone mad for speaking out we are new at this. I must say it did not feel good to see him treat dog like junk. He was just sitting on his rear end doing nothing. Now all this has been said and I know should I ever see this happen again I will just go to the AKC rep and tell them the number and the dog and let them take care of it.
I should hope to never see this man again or hope to see nothing again. We did walk around and looked at all people, dogs and everyone was good to there dogs. The man with his whippets was like us they even slept with him. He told us all about them they are his pets as well as his show dogs.
Enough said I learned something. I do not buy book as not sure I really would need it. Thank you for the imput Pat.

Rita Jean

That is the best choice, report the problem to the AKC Rep.. that is why they are there… And another reason is that you do not want to get into an altercation with a person that might be a hot head... that would not be good for anyone,

I do have a question, however, when you say "kick" the dog back... was it really a kick with the shoe, or did the person "knee" the dog in the chest (using his knee) when he jump up?

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