• Oh my gawd - your house lvoss must be truely chaos 🙂


  • All very good replies. I can see how independent this breed is, and in a way, that's what I want in a dog–one that can think for himself. I think I'm afraid that if it runs off it won't come back. I keep thinking about what I read on how the bushmen used the dog, to push the game into nets. It can obviously be trained to work as a team also, instead of just deciding on its own what to do all the time. Does anyone have any info on how they were trained in Africa? That would be very interesting. I really like the trainability of my Doberman. He has spoiled me. He can figure things out. The beagle doesn't bug me to go play. He is more laid back. The Dobe needs me to play on a schedule every day. He has energy to burn and knows he needs to run around. Then he is a happy dog. I enjoy both of them.


  • I can certainly attest to the independence and inttelligence. When we call Dash to come he is always, always, always rewarded with cheese wether we are in the house, yard, whatever. He know this and if he does get loose he will come after much socialization with neighbors to get his cheese. Getting a B to come when called can be especially challenging in the patience arena so plan ahead.

    Dash has decided over the last few days or so that he no longer wants to be in the expen. He jumps on it until it lifts up at the bottom and then dives underneath. This takes about 5 minutes now. We have decided to comply and we gate off the upstairs. He can jump the gate but the beagle can't and he won't be alone. We just put his blanket on the couch and so far he has been content. God, I hope it lasts. That is why I am now looking in to doggie doors so they can come and go as they please.

    Our life is constantly adjusting to the dogs needs and wants. It is like living with another very pushy adult.


  • I take two of my basenjis for country walks off leash with other friends with dogs. All the dogs mostly stay together and all are rewarded frequently for "checking in" with their owners. I am always prepared to leash mine up and probably do leash mine more often than the people with other dogs. So can basenjis be off leash? Yes, but as an owner you will have to make sure the situations are ones that are safe and understand that if you are where there is a lot of wildlife you will probably have to leash them. I would not recommend a basenji to a person who really wants a dog that is going to be good offleash. Their hard wiring is to give chase and though with training you can raise your value so they are more likely to stay near by or if they give chase that they will not go too far, that hard wiring will always be there. They can be good off leash but it is not something that I would expect.


  • Nala is a big off leash hiker. She has hiked miles and miles of the Long Trail, which is only about 1 mile from our house. She seems like she can go on forever! It is very rural and no cars are even remotely close, otherwise we wouldn't have her off leash. There is a logging road that we access the trails from and she is on leash to and from the main trail.


  • ok, so the B.'s are independent, do what they want etc…. So what is it about the breed that outweighs all the negative factors. What is it about them that makes you put up with them. ??


  • Now there is the 64 Thousand Dollar question, I ask myself that all the time! Personally, I like the independence, they are not "clingy" dogs.. they are not dogs that stand there with a ball in their mouth 24/7 waiting for you to throw it…. they have a sense of humor and their people need one also... they are great bed dogs... Relative to many breeds they are pretty healthy and those of us who breed care deeply about raising sound, health, good temperaments and confomation correct Basenjis that will not only make great family companions but great show/performance dogs.


  • Basenjis are not necessarily "good dogs" but they are wonderful friends, housemates, partners. They are very smart, always thinking, which challenges you to be constantly out-thinking them (or trying to). They are clean, elegant, lovely to look at, with bright intelligent eyes. They are thoughtful creatures, sympathetic when you are ill or hurt, ready to snuggle for a week! Want to run or bike? They are great athletes, keep them in shape and a 5 month old can run 5 miles and not even pant. How do I love them, let me count the ways…..........

    Of course you MUST have a sense of humor, and show pride when your basenji outsmarts you. And you have found a great 'support group', where all of us that are truly nuts about our basenjis chat and commiserate together.

    They are fun, they are a pain, they are a joy.

    Does that answer your question?

    Anne in Tampa


  • Because they are way smarter than humans;
    Because they have great compassion for their human partners;
    Because they are mischevious and will make you laugh and cry at the same time;
    Because they don't demand you constantly play with them;
    Because they are clean and don't smell;
    Because they are houdinis;
    Because they have great expressive faces;
    Because they …
    Because ...
    🙂


  • wow. They sound like such a neat dog. I will keep all this in mind as look around. Thanks for all the replies.


  • I think the best thing is to go and meet them in person and not just one family of basenjis talk to a couple of breeders and meet their dogs. Each one is an individual and each family of dogs is a little different.

    I had one person visit with my dogs at a lure trial. My girl wanted a better view of the field and crawled up to stand on his head and scream in his ear because she wanted the lure so bad. He still wanted a basenji and came back to meet them at home where all my girl wanted was to be pet and given attention.

    I have had other people who have come over after they met other breeders' dogs and they comment on how different each family of dog is. They are all basenjis and all have traits in common but there are individual quirks that make them all a little different too.


  • As soon as I see some advertised, I will talk with some of the breeders. I will know more when I see the dogs. I always go by what my gut tells me. I will know then. But aside from the negative factors, the more positive ones mentioned are what I want in my next dog. I want a companion, snuggle bunny, something to go with me everywhere, and hiking, as I am getting out in the field more this year to study my herbs in the wild. And it would be nice not to turn around and have him/her beaming his little thoughts of "play ball now" into my head several times a day. My Dobe does that. He is fun though.


  • @chilingoober:

    As soon as I see some advertised, I will talk with some of the breeders. I will know more when I see the dogs. I always go by what my gut tells me. I will know then. But aside from the negative factors, the more positive ones mentioned are what I want in my next dog. I want a companion, snuggle bunny, something to go with me everywhere, and hiking, as I am getting out in the field more this year to study my herbs in the wild. And it would be nice not to turn around and have him/her beaming his little thoughts of "play ball now" into my head several times a day. My Dobe does that. He is fun though.

    Advertise? as in where? You usually will not find responsible breeder advertise except for their own websites and a few that can afford to try and advertise on some of the internet sites. You should contact breeders in your area by going to www.basenji.org and then to the breeder directory and/or look under the local regional clubs link and contact the clubs for referrals. Please go to a responsible breeder…

    Oh and Basenjis typically do NOT play ball...ggg...


  • @tanza:

    Oh and Basenjis typically do NOT play ball…ggg...

    Hee Hee.:D Dash will chase after it but once he gets it he kindof loses interest or rips it to shreds.


  • @dash:

    Hee Hee.:D Dash will chase after it but once he gets it he kindof loses interest or rips it to shreds.

    Exactly my point 😃 …. usually they will watch you thrown it... like to say "hey you want it, you go get it!"... and go off to do something else...


  • I have found that I really don't enjoy the ball throwing as much. The dobe wants to play 2-3 times a day. But we can't go for walks right now because of the weather, and a houseful down with the flu.
    Yes, I will call on a breeder that advertises, because I want to see the dogs. Then I will know more how I want to proceed and where, IF the breed seems right for me. I will go with the best breeder that I can find, if this is the right breed. I am taking my time. I have to think 10 years + down the line.
    Does anyone use a pack on their basenji?


  • @chilingoober:

    I have found that I really don't enjoy the ball throwing as much. The dobe wants to play 2-3 times a day. But we can't go for walks right now because of the weather, and a houseful down with the flu.
    Yes, I will call on a breeder that advertises, because I want to see the dogs. Then I will know more how I want to proceed and where, IF the breed seems right for me. I will go with the best breeder that I can find, if this is the right breed. I am taking my time. I have to think 10 years + down the line.
    Does anyone use a pack on their basenji?

    Can you explain about "breeders that advertises"? I would think that you would want one that was a member of the National and/or regional breed club?


  • @chilingoober:

    Does anyone use a pack on their basenji?

    I bought one for Tiggy, I use the Ruff Wear packs. I have just got him started into getting used to it. My boxer wears a pack to. He didn't even notice any different when I put it on him empty, and didn't care when I stuffed it with paper to widen it. So far he's only carried two (one each side) 12 ounce bottles of water. He's still young (7 months) so I don't want him carrying anything heavier. I haven't packed and hiked in while now so I have to condition my boxer back into it again. When he was conditioned he'd carry between 15 to 18 pounds. This was for our longer camping hikes, for shorter hikes it would be about 10 pounds.

    A basenji in good healthy conditioning can carry 20-25% of their body weight on average about 5 to 6 pounds for a 25lbs dog. Young dogs and older should carry about 15% of their weight.


  • Tanza, on breeders that advertise, and the club breeders:
    That would be nice. So far I have not found any listed within several hundred miles. Like I said, I will know when I see the dogs.

    I think dogs come into our lives for a reason. The Dobe came and taught me how to be a leader, even through disabilites. He pulled me through a rough time in my life, as he was going through his. He will always be with me. The beagle taught us, well, the hound mind, and pulled my son through hard time. I love watching the beagle work through the scents and mentally "categorize" what he smells. He has taught me to take in life, that there is a place for everything. IF I get a basenji, or similar breed, I know it will be to teach me independence. To stand on my own 2 feet and be more sure of myself. Because I know that is a stage I have to enter in this time of my life.
    Please don't lecture me about how to pick a puppy. I understand about the backyard breeders… I have done my reading. I have raised numerous types of animals my whole life. They have all been my teachers. I will find the best breeder I can.


  • WBL:

    Do you have trouble with your boxer in the heat? I was advised on the boxer board to not even think about getting one, because they have heat exhaustion starting in the 80 degree temp range> because of their short snouts. We live in Texas. Usually not the high humidity, although the weather has been changing over the last several years to more humidity during the summer, usually its a dry heat. We do get hot. By August it is 100 deg. every day.

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