Any leash training tips?

Anything along the lines suggested by Malik or eeefarm. I'll just add that treats can be useful as well.

However, you're right that at four months your pup needs to explore. Twigs, sprinklers, clumps of grass are all new an exciting. So at this point you may not want to overly focus on how they walk on a leash.

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@malik This is awesome I love it!! I'll definitely try these methods out, I have a feeling the search game will be her new favorite!

@tanza said in Any leash training tips?:

And in fact note that many will say "my dog is friendly" when in fact the owner has no clue that their dog is invading another dogs space on a lead...

Dogs on leads feel vulnerable and that is the time NOT to allow your dog to approach too closely, regardless of what the other owner says. We aren't even in a 'smaller community', elbrant, we are deep in the countryside. But we still try to avoid other people and other dogs. On the rare occasions we meet others out on the myriad public footpaths which abound around here - both or all dogs are grabbed or reined in and one party backs right off down a side trail if there is one, behind trees if there isn't. Or even just a discreet distance out onto the field.

If one dog is on a lead and another free, the tethered dog will feel vulnerable and so the owner of the free dog has to control it NOT to approach too close. This is done with patient training - recall being to me one of the most important things a puppy should be taught. Mku (aout 17 - 18 weeks now) will brake and come back to a whistle (I can do that extremely piercingly). Sometimes he gets a treat and sometimes inordinate praise. He is always hopeful for the former !

On the lead, going up through the village, he pulls, I stop. He stops, we go on. To drop the lead and stand on it - I might miss it and have him under a car in seconds ! My arm is quite strong enough to hold him - LOL

@zande said in Any leash training tips?:

To drop the lead and stand on it - I might miss it and have him under a car in seconds

The idea isn't to drop the lead, but (stop and) stand on a section of it between the leash handle and the dog collar. IMO, body weight trumps arm strength against a pulling dog. (Dog age, size and breed makes a difference.)


@zande said in Any leash training tips?:

Dogs on leads feel vulnerable

True, I've noticed this myself. A tight leash-hold is a clear indication that the other dog owner/walker is not interested in any interaction. I use a "leave it" command which I use for things like trash, (other) dogs solids, or dogs that I want her to pass by and ignore.


@tanza said in Any leash training tips?:

many will say "my dog is friendly" when in fact the owner has no clue

LOL, too true!

@malik said in Any leash training tips?:
It sounds as if we both have the same walk philosophy. It is HER walk, for her enjoyment, so as long as she is not in danger, I let her sniff and check out what ever she wants. she loves it and never wants the walk to end. My dog too loves to watch for other people or animals coming and will "freeze" up to where I cannot budge her! Usually I can stop and pet her a little and she will then start moving again, But I have had to pick her up and carry her twice because she just would not move. I love this idea "We also have a game where I say "search" and throw a treat on the ground. It's great, because the treat bounces and she loves to chase it" and Iplan to do this with her.

@malik said in Any leash training tips?:

I've also done a lot of additional training at home. Impulse control is important. Not eating before your say so, place treats on the floor etc. On walks, I often stop her and ask for her to sit and to give paw etc. We also have a game where I say "search" and throw a treat on the ground. It's great, because the treat bounces and she loves to chase it with her eyes or nose.

If I was doing this with a dog I would not use anything edible, but something she can "find" and trade for a treat. Maybe a toy the dog likes, or something along that line. Dogs are natural scavengers and will gobble up most anything (edible or not!) that they find on the ground. Personally I want to discourage, not encourage, that behaviour. Dogs can and do sniff and ingest things that make them ill. The owner may not even realize that something encountered on a walk is what is making the dog sick. I do like the idea of playing games with the dog, but I would want to be sure the games are safe. For the same reason I have a problem with people allowing unlimited sniffing around. Before you know it, the dog is eating something it shouldn't. If you want to let your dog sniff, please be very observant and ready to intervene if the situation becomes unsafe. You do not want your dog sniffing other dogs' feces. It's a good way for them to pick up something nasty that may cost you a trip to the vet, or worse!

last edited by eeeefarm

@malik said in Any leash training tips?:

so she isn't able to sniff around where I can't see.

Honestly, "doodle's" nose is becoming legendary. I'll think she's smelling the bush (or urine on it) and she'll come out with a bagel in her mouth! (yes, this actually happened!) I have learned that she can find all manner of things that are clearly obvious to her nose and undetectable to my eyes. If your pup is intent on what she's smelling, there's a reason for it.

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