Basenji wanted in maryland

Hi all, new member here, looking for a basenji adult in Maryland, or the DC area.

We're BRAT approved, I'm a pro R+ trainer, raw diet, long walks, leash always, home alot, no kids or cats or other dogs at the moment, beaucoup love, just lost our dog to cancer and we're so ready for a little basenji sunshine.

If anyone on the basenji grapevine has a little buzz to share with us, we'd love to hear from you.

I think Robyn on this list has adults in GA, and Signet Basenjis has adults in TX.

@lisastewart:

I think Robyn on this list has adults in GA, and Signet Basenjis has adults in TX.

Robyn in GA is Sherwood Basenjis
http://www.sherwoodbasenjis.com/

thanks, team. should have been more clear–hoping to rescue, but/and will talk to anyone in the more immediate DC area

Check the rescue section about Zeba, young red girl recently rescued from Atlanta, in Tampa now but if you are interested, transport probably could be arranged.

Thanks, Anne, I did see her. I have no other dogs at the moment–sounds like ms Z would really benefit from the company of other dogs to ease her transition from neglect. Do you agree?

There are a couple of other dogs nearer to me in that same situation, and so it's a no-go for them, too, unfortunately. Kinda frustrating, but the dogs will benefit most in a gang of other more experienced dogs.

What age range are you looking for?

Jennifer

Lots of BRAT folks here. I am hopeful you find a new companion soon.

Sometimes you have to travel a bit to find that perfect dog. There is the family from Fla that traveled to Robyn's home… and found that perfect fit... and I have no doubt that if you are willing you would to... Not just rescue needs those perfect homes. There are many breeders that have older puppies or adults looking for their forever homes.

@dcmclcm4:

What age range are you looking for?

Jennifer

Thanks, everyone, and Sharron, bravo to BRAT for being one of the best organized and most effective rescues I've ever encountered.

I'm looking for someone beyond adolescence, basically, and I don't have a problem with older dogs, tho my husband is a harder sell on the seniors. He gets very attached, and we just lost a dog, so he's not in a hurry to lose another, but 5+ is no problem at all.

We need a secure dog who knows what a home is since we don't have a flock of dogs to help a scared newbie adjust.

@tanza:

Sometimes you have to travel a bit to find that perfect dog. There is the family from Fla that traveled to Robyn's home… and found that perfect fit... and I have no doubt that if you are willing you would to... Not just rescue needs those perfect homes. There are many breeders that have older puppies or adults looking for their forever homes.

Thank you Pat. A dog from the right environment is important. We have many shelters and rescues who bring dogs here to the DC area from rural high-kill shelters down south and in other places. The dogs sometimes have a hard time adapting to the very dynamic and pressured urban/suburban social environment have here. I train these dogs all the time, and it's very challenging for the families who adopt them. So a city dog would be great for us, but a country dog might not do as well if s/he isn't already socialized pretty well. That's a more important thing for us than the actual location if you know what I mean.

Are you looking for a rescue or is an adult from a breeder an option for you?

Also, there is alot in between country and city. Many dogs are from the suburbs. Having worked with shelter dogs, rescues, and well bred dogs, I really think it is the early socialization, training, and genetics that are the main factors not city vs country. I have seen poorly socialized, poorly trained, poorly bred city dogs that were just as bad as their country cousins and vice versa.

If you are really looking for certain things in your dog, your best bet is working with a responsible breeder.

@hazel-up:

Thank you Pat. A dog from the right environment is important. We have many shelters and rescues who bring dogs here to the DC area from rural high-kill shelters down south and in other places. The dogs sometimes have a hard time adapting to the very dynamic and pressured urban/suburban social environment have here. I train these dogs all the time, and it's very challenging for the families who adopt them. So a city dog would be great for us, but a country dog might not do as well if s/he isn't already socialized pretty well. That's a more important thing for us than the actual location if you know what I mean.

I think I understand what you are saying. But if you were to go the route of a slightly older dog from a responsible breeder, you would probably get exactly what you want. Lots of breeders have retired show dogs, who are done being mommas (or dads) and ready to go into their own loving home. They have already been VERY well socialized by being raised in a busy home, and toted to very busy shows where they are expected tolerate all sorts of craziness 😉 And they usually have excellent house manners because breeders can't really have a bunch of out of control dogs running around the house. These dogs are no less needy and hopeful for a loving/spoiling home than most rescued dogs; and you get the added benefit of someone at your beck and call to answer questions and help you however they can in the responsible breeder… Just something to think about 🙂

@lvoss:

Are you looking for a rescue or is an adult from a breeder an option for you?

Also, there is alot in between country and city. Many dogs are from the suburbs. Having worked with shelter dogs, rescues, and well bred dogs, I really think it is the early socialization, training, and genetics that are the main factors not city vs country. I have seen poorly socialized, poorly trained, poorly bred city dogs that were just as bad as their country cousins and vice versa.

If you are really looking for certain things in your dog, your best bet is working with a responsible breeder.

Thanks, Ivoss and Andrea, and of course there's no hard and fast rule about city and country.

All the options are on the table for us (except a pup), and I agree, retired show dogs are often bomb-proof, and beautiful into the bargain.

Hoping to rescue locally, that's the first choice, and then we go from there, so putting the word out and seeing where the chips fall. A retired show dog would be wonderful, too.

Guys, I am sorry, but if someone wanted a SHOW dog and I pushed rescue repeatedly after they kept saying from breeder or show… well you get the point.

Hazel, Brat in FL has a lot of WONDERFUL adults. We have a Facebook page for our Wimauma adopters even... Pam has done a superior job. Please contact them about the adults.

@DebraDownSouth:

Guys, I am sorry, but if someone wanted a SHOW dog and I pushed rescue repeatedly after they kept saying from breeder or show… well you get the point.

Hazel, Brat in FL has a lot of WONDERFUL adults. We have a Facebook page for our Wimauma adopters even... Pam has done a superior job. Please contact them about the adults.

Debra, the only reason that I mention adult dogs available from breeders is because a lot of people don't REALIZE there are adult dogs who need homes from breeders. I don't give a crap who gets their dog from where, or what their reasoning is…but I do want people to have all the information available to make a decision.

If someone wants a rescue because they are ethically committed to that plan then fine. But I want it to be clear that there are plenty of adoptable adult dogs available from breeders, too.

In the interest of being totally on topic..

Rescues make as good of pets as breeders. I know, in fact, more people who have issues with their breeder dogs than with rescues. Does this mean breeders in general do badly? No. Responsible breeders do great, but you don't have to be in the big ole world long to learn that many who claim responsible are far from it. So let's not claim any great advantage in how well a rescue or a breeder's dog is better as a pet.

A responsible breeder with generations of health clearances is a better choice in most cases for health, but not always. And with a healthy breed like this, most of the time the most poorly bred specimen (like dear utterly poorly bred Cara), still are as healthy as most registered ones. Strip test all of them.

A good rescue, like a good breeder, is there to help you at all times and they are there for your dog for life. In fact, here's a bonus. With a breeder, if your breeder dies/gets sick, you have no one. With a rescue, you have a whole organization to help, rehome or whatever is needed.

A good breeder's dogs are never in the situation of rescues, who have often been in at least 3 homes (counting breeder/home/foster) or more and need a home. Although BRAT keeps them til they find a home, many die in shelters for lack of homes. And while BRAT certainly tries to find great foster homes, I honestly suggest that the home of a years and years of experienced breeder is not as dire as that of a foster dog.

So choose your needs. Unless you want to show, compete or breed, that pet will be perfect.

Debra, this is your perception…not the reality! I don't bash rescues, I fully support rescues. YOU are the one inserting words that I NEVER said or thought. YOU are the one who brings this up repeatedly. This is YOUR issue...not mine...so please keep it to yourself! Frankly, I am kind of sick of the world according to Debra!

IF the original poster felt overwhelmed by our suggestions that there are other options than rescue, she handled it with grace and politeness...unlike you...

Giving benefit of doubt, so post removed, except to say if you know breeders whose adult dogs are in desperate need of homes, please do consider talking to them not breeding so often.

@DebraDownSouth:

Will remove my part and put your EXACT words, which indicates precisely what I said.

And I am sick of breeders hawking dogs when others ask for rescues and whining about adults needing homes. Here's an idea… if you can't place your dogs and end up with adults all the time, stop breeding so often. What a concept.

Debra, really…. get over it.... It is just being pointed out that there are other directions to look at when wanting a Basenji. Breeders end up with adults for the SAME reason BRAT does... only difference is they are responsible and take back their Basenjis instead of them going to BRAT. So why is that so different?

And BRAT is not always the easiest group to work with in addition they do have restrictions that maybe a breeder with an adult to place might find acceptable.

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