FDA Advisory on Chicken Jerky

I'm going to have to watch the brands I use of these. I cut them up for training treats.

Also note that they mention Fanconi-like symptoms (glucose in urine).

http://www.fda.gov/cvm/CVM_Updates/ComplaintsChicJerky.htm

Preliminary Animal Health Notification

December 19, 2008

FDA Continues To Receive Complaints about Chicken Jerky Products for Dogs and Cautions Consumers

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to caution consumers of a potential association between the development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats. FDA continues to receive complaints of dogs experiencing illness that their owners or veterinarians associate with consumption of chicken jerky products. The chicken jerky products are imported to the U.S. from China. FDA issued a cautionary warning to consumers in September 2007.

Australian news organizations report the University of Sydney is also investigating an association between illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky in Australia. At least one firm in Australia has recalled their chicken jerky product and the recall notification stated the chicken jerky product was manufactured in China.

FDA believes the continued trend of consumer complaints coupled with the information obtained from Australia warrants an additional reminder and animal health notification.

Chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be
used occasionally and in small quantities. Owners of small dogs must be especially careful to limit the amount of these products.

FDA, in addition to several veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the U.S, is working to determine why these products are associated with illness in dogs. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.

FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs which may occur within hours to days of feeding the product: decreased appetite, although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; and increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose). Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky. Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator http://www.fda.gov/opacom/backgrounders/complain.html in their state.

I saw that the chicken jerky/chicken tenders at Trader Joe's were from China. It would probably be cheaper if you just bought your own chicken tenders and dehydrated them yourself.

I think I'll stick with Merrick's dried beef filets for now for training. Nemo likes those almost as much as the chicken strips.

Oh crap!! Thanks for posting this!! I feed my dogs half a piece of jerkey a day with their peanutbuttered hoof. I just went and looked– it's Waggin' Train brand... and it says MADE IN CHINA!! Eeek!! Now we're gonna have to find a substitute. I really liked those because the dogs LOVE them and they're cheap at Costco. Boo!!

Chicken jerky

thinly slice white meat from chicken (season as you see fit)
put on a cooking cooling rack
put in oven at 150F for 4 hours, turning 1/2 way through

refrigerate after cooking; dark meat works, but it is greasier

no need for china after all

this also works with turkey as i found out yesterday since it was on sale.

@Nemo:

I'm going to have to watch the brands I use of these. I cut them up for training treats.

Also note that they mention Fanconi-like symptoms (glucose in urine).

http://www.fda.gov/cvm/CVM_Updates/ComplaintsChicJerky.htm

Preliminary Animal Health Notification

December 19, 2008

FDA Continues To Receive Complaints about Chicken Jerky Products for Dogs and Cautions Consumers

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to caution consumers of a potential association between the development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats. FDA continues to receive complaints of dogs experiencing illness that their owners or veterinarians associate with consumption of chicken jerky products. The chicken jerky products are imported to the U.S. from China. FDA issued a cautionary warning to consumers in September 2007.

Australian news organizations report the University of Sydney is also investigating an association between illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky in Australia. At least one firm in Australia has recalled their chicken jerky product and the recall notification stated the chicken jerky product was manufactured in China.

FDA believes the continued trend of consumer complaints coupled with the information obtained from Australia warrants an additional reminder and animal health notification.

Chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be
used occasionally and in small quantities. Owners of small dogs must be especially careful to limit the amount of these products.

FDA, in addition to several veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the U.S, is working to determine why these products are associated with illness in dogs. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.

FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs which may occur within hours to days of feeding the product: decreased appetite, although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; and increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose). Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky. Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator http://www.fda.gov/opacom/backgrounders/complain.html in their state.

Thanks for the Heads Up!

We noticed a problem with giving Chicken based treats to our Basenji several months ago. Our Basenji would throw up yellow bile sometime in the next 12-24 hour period. Our Boston Terrier was having some loose stools she did not seem affected in same way so we attributed the Basenji throwing up the yellow bile as an allergic reaction to chicken or a chicken related product. We did note that we also had issues with both of our dogs Stools when feeding Chicken Based EVO so we switched to Red Meat EVO and the loose Stool issue improved. We now feed a mixture of Taste of the Wild Salmon and Red Meat EVO.

I just checked the package of the Chicken Chips Marketed under the VitaLife Label and noticed that they are a product of China as the warning mentions. The other Chicken Based treat is Called Holistic Select Natural Dog Treats manufactured by Eagle Pack. Although it says Made in USA on the package I question where the ingredients are sourced from. Our Basenji had the same reaction to Both the Holistic Select Chicken Treat as well at the VitaLife Treats. Neither of our dogs have had any reaction to the Holistic Select Salmon but we are still questioning the possibility of issues with the Holistic Duck treats as well.

At this point, we are sure that our Basenji has issues with chicken based treats.

Jason and Miranda

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