Effective Insect Repellent!

@zande šŸ˜† they are definitely a law unto themselves... in every way! Thank you so much for all your help xx

@roojuice garlic is completely acceptable. Mine often have it
. I make my own liver titbits and include garlic with them. I've never heard that it's a no-no for Basenjis - I don't know about other dogs.

Grapes kills dogs. Most of the people I know fed grapes as treats before they discovered it can in fact kill them. I go with the "if it's toxic in even small quantities, why risk it?"

Garlic in SMALL doses is not harmful. In large doses it is a problem. Dogs love garlic... many dog foods used it.

From AKC:

How much garlic is toxic to dogs?
Studies have found it takes approximately 15 to 30 grams of garlic per kilograms of body weight to produce harmful changes in a dogā€™s blood. To put that into perspective, the average clove of supermarket garlic weighs between 3 and 7 grams, so your dog would have to eat a lot to get really sick. However, some dogs are more sensitive to garlic toxicity than others, and consumption of a toxic dose spread out over a few days could also cause problems.<<
https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-garlic/

Chocolate in enough doses can and does kill dogs. My friend's retriever stole a bag of miniatures, unwrapped them one by one and ate them all. Big dog, not that much actual chocolate, dog was fine. Just don't share if you can help it.

As for Antigone on dark, you have it entirely backwards.

https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/chocolate-poisoning-in-dogs

Dogs cannot metabolize theobromine and caffeine as well as people can. This makes them more sensitive to the chemicalsā€™ effects.

How much chocolate is poisonous to a dog?
The amount of toxic theobromine varies with the type of chocolate. The darker and more bitter the chocolate, the more dangerous it is to dogs. <<

@roojuice
Please trust your vet.
And eucalyptus oil is definitely not good for dogs. The craze in the US for diffusers has resulted in a lot of dogs being poisoned. As a general rule, always check with dog poison sites and err on the side of safety.

When ingested in sufficient amounts this oil, eucalyptol, is an irritant to the gastrointestinal system, causing discomfort, vomiting, and diarrhea. ... If your dog has ingested any part of the eucalyptus plant or a product containing eucalyptus oil it is important to contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.<<

There is a saying... we do better as we learn better. I've lucked out on dogs not dying from garlic, grapes, chocolate, onions etc before I knew... but who knows how many times they were sick or distressed and I didn't connect? You can't protect from everything, but at least I try with known issues.

Only trouble is, Debra, I haven't (yet) learned how to get my dogs to read books or to google things on the computer. I know what they shouldn't eat and take every (reasonable) precaution but it isn't easy to counter the wiles of a Basenji intent on trying new things !

OK, I've been lucky but also relaxed !

If they are ever sick or appear ill (very rare occurrence) they go STRAIGHT to the vet with a list of recent menus, activities, haunts etc.

@zande said in Effective Insect Repellent!:

Only trouble is, Debra, I haven't (yet) learned how to get my dogs to read books or to google things on the computer. I know what they shouldn't eat and take every (reasonable) precaution but it isn't easy to counter the wiles of a Basenji intent on trying new things !

OK, I've been lucky but also relaxed !

If they are ever sick or appear ill (very rare occurrence) they go STRAIGHT to the vet with a list of recent menus, activities, haunts etc.

I hope it was clear I was talking about intentionally giving stuff to them, and trying to be careful... not any pretense that it's not an uphill battle.

Btw, not sure about mustard but a tablespoon of salt is really effective for making dogs throw up.

As for relaxed, I don't think being careful is not relaxed. Knowing I have MOST things locked up or in sturdy containers (like xylitol, medication, chocolate) helps me be more relaxed.

I used the mustard on the (SKYPEd) advice of an American breeder I was conversing with at the time, Debra. I couldn't think what to give him. He was sitting in the middle of the kitchen table beside the empty dish of truffles, licking his lips and looking the picture of health ! He enjoyed the mustard. I used Coleman's powdered mustard which you mix with a little water. It is quite strong. I do realise you didn't assume I'd given him home-made rum truffles deliberately.

Any more than I fed Hoover a pair of socks and the collar of a polo shirt yesterday. The clean laundry was in the bag I use to get up and down stairs with when I need to carry anything. Hip is vastly improved but I can't yet walk them in the woods and have to be punished.ā˜¹

BAD slow moving Mom !

@zande

I have never seen powdered mustard but I'm sure we can get it. Will add to my ER drawer. But salt has never let me down. It's almost instantaneous.

While he is getting better, we've spent much of Moose's life (he's 20 mos) saying "What's in your mouth?" He took a bottle of Visine eye lubricant off my desk a couple of days ago. If Leora hadn't grabbed him fast he would have swallowed it. Socks are his favorites, but any clothing will do. So far he hasn't eaten them, but if it's small enough to swallow, he will. The Samoyed board members assure me he isn't special, they are notorious. How is that trait useful for survival?

For carrying, have you thought about a big backpack? Because I use arm canes, carrying my purse was an issue and then my daughter got me this big backpack. It really is easy. I hope your hip heals soon.

Cymbopogon narduus is citronella - I use a product containing this and I find it very effective against insect bites (and my male has allegies so I'm always looking for things that will help him). I'm told lavender can also be effective in controlling the itchiness associated with bites but I've not tried it directly.

@debradownsouth said in Effective Insect Repellent!:

While he is getting better, we've spent much of Moose's life (he's 20 mos) saying "What's in your mouth?"

My catchphrase is "What have you got NOW ?" when addressing the Basenjis.

Bonemeal is a favourite and if I am planting a new bush or plants, I daren't let them see me do it. I object to the digging up of fresh greenery which otherwise results from allowing canine spectators.

The fabric bag is only for taking things up and down stairs, Debra. I use a back pack outdoors sometimes.

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