Show Class

My son and Jaycee went to there first show class tonight. Well it was good I think they both had fun. Eli liked trying to run with Jaycee. We have a ways to go Jaycee showed us what she thought of the class. 1st she had a poop and then she took a pee like o no your house broke. Eli was not sure about placing her on the table. Well maybe next week will be better I hope you have to start some were.

Rita Jean

Jaycee must of been nervous. Did you walk her first so she could go before going in the class?

At the conformation classes & obedience classes my dogs and I took, the trainers asked that we feed the dogs their evening meal after class. So in my case, I got home from work, peed & pooped the dogs and then took them to class. I got them to pee again right before class, but poop was finished until their evening feeding. Maybe try changing her evening feeding time on class nights.

Regarding the pee. Definitely try & get Jaycee to pee before class starts. If she won't, maybe take her into class, let her see all the other dogs and then take her right back outside - I bet she might go then because of all the excitement. And since she is still a pup, even if she pees before class, I would take her out again at least half way thru the class.

Houston

I am glad they had fun, a little nerves I bet is very common. I've tried getting Otis on our table, forget it, he is a basketcase..so new things are nervous things at our house.

When we did our obedience training we were told by our trainer not to feed them prior to a class, I think mainly to keep them treat motivated, but probably also to keep the peeing and pooping to a minimum.
How often is the class, once a week? I am so happy you are giving this a go..can't wait to hear how things are moving along…and see pictures too :):)

You should practice at home with her on the table. You can use anything but if a smooth service be sure to put something on there that will prevent them from slipping

Thanks everyone Jaycee was some what nervous she always wants to play. Really good thing she is so friendly and wants to play but not right then and there. Last night she fell in love with a five month old bloodhound that was hugh.
Jaycee likes the table maybe the only thing we have done right we always tell her place on lots of things been good.
We went to potty before we went in but not enough that's for sure and I will change dinner hour for sure. I will try taking her out 1/2 through class to potty that might help. We have to work on her to let us see her teeth she is like no way those are mine.
We go to class every Monday night only for one hour but that is long enough or least last night it was.
One of the ladies that was there last night was a former Judge of dogs said she has nice stance and good teeth. Now we just have to get it right with her.

Pat got a question knowing Jaycee has had litle training and Eli the same in Oct I beleive 10th and11th there is a show would you let them try just to get started? They told me Eli could do one were he would be judged junior and should do Jaycee next day be another judge. What do you think I know we have to start some were?

Rita Jean

If you have never been to a show or have only been there once, I would just go a watch again, rather then enter. The class that Eli would be in is Jr. Showmanship where he is judged on how he shows the dog. If anything, I would opt for that class before you go for conformation where the dog is being judged.

And it is MOST important that before you enter her in a show that the judge can look at her teeth… You do not want to take a dog in the ring that is going to fight about having their teeth looked at... IMO... Especially with a novice handler and a Jr at that... they are going to be nervous enough... and the dog will feel that and really think there is something wrong.....

Thank you for the answer will talk over with my husband and tell him the advise that I ask for.
I did learn one thing last night one lady had a show martingale leash and had a awful time with it. She also had another leash she used and she said it was easier for her. Going to look at leash's today.

Rita Jean

I think that a nice choke chain and lead is the easier… make sure that the lead is NOT too long, especially for your son. I use a 30" lead.

And if you go and just watch the show, you can visit the vendors and look for a nice chain and lead....

Thanks again I am getting one for us to use at least here at home so we can practice. When we go to show I will look for another one. Let you know what I come up with today hopefully I will find one going to store called Dresslers has anything and everything on all animals.

Rita Jean

I'll echo Tanza's comments about waiting to enter. I've only been doing this since late July, and I'll say it's very easy to let nerves get the best of you when you get in the ring and you almost don't realize what you're doing sometimes when nerves get the best of you. I'd suggest waiting until Eli is confident and practiced in class or at home about what to do and Jaycee is comfortable with the procedures before doing it for real. There isn't any rush, and it's more of a challenge with puppies too.

Ideally, it would be great if he can develop a system, so that everytime he goes into the ring, he does things the same exact way every time (of course, Jaycee may throw that off a little) regarding stacking, etc. That way he almost won't have to think about the procedure so much and he can concentrate on making the dog look good as he gets more experience and more practice. I'm learning this now from personal experience, I've been a little lucky in the ring starting out, but it's been more due to my dog versus my handling (not sure I want to see the video from Nationals, lol). This past weekend at a show one of my club members who was also attending basically communicated those tips as she very nicely ripped apart my handling techniques (or lack thereof) and rebuilt them to something more effective. So I've got lots of practicing to do before my next show.

All that being said, I think it's a lot of fun so I hope Eli and Jaycee have a good time in a new adventure!

Also, before I got a grooming table, I used the kitchen counter with one of those soft rubber shelf liners that you can get at Wal-Mart. My dog can stand on it easily without slipping.

I second what Pat says about length of lead. For me just starting out, I've found that the 30" lead is best for me (I'm short - 5'4") - anything longer seemed like I was always fumbling with the extra lead length.

I use a simple Resco Cordo Hyde loop lead and 14" chain that was suggested by some breeders at the first show I attended. I've since changed the chain to one that has small rings on the ends as I borrowed one of those for my handling clinic and liked the response of it better. Otherwise for now, while I'm still learning, the Resco is good enough and seems to give good control. I've tried a braided one, but it was long and I think I am just more used to my own lead at this point.

@Nemo:

Ideally, it would be great if he can develop a system, so that everytime he goes into the ring, he does things the same exact way every time (of course, Jaycee may throw that off a little) regarding stacking, etc. That way he almost won't have to think about the procedure so much and he can concentrate on making the dog look good as he gets more experience and more practice. I'm learning this now from personal experience, I've been a little lucky in the ring starting out, but it's been more due to my dog versus my handling (not sure I want to see the video from Nationals, lol). This past weekend at a show one of my club members who was also attending basically communicated those tips as she very nicely ripped apart my handling techniques (or lack thereof) and rebuilt them to something more effective. So I've got lots of practicing to do before my next show.

Can you maybe elaborate on "the routine" for Rita - she might not know what you mean and it would probably be helpful for her son.

Houston

I love reading about this, it is so much to learn and I am soaking it all up for future needs, should it arise.

You might also ask in class if there are any matches coming up… those are a great place for beginners to start as they are like a real show with many of the same classes, always the same ring procedure... many kennel clubs have matches during the year, some are after a regular show, some are "stand alone".

And it is very easy for children to get discouraged... so the more practiced he is the better he will feel about himself in the ring... always remember, it is not just him in the ring.. he has a living animal that he will be trying to control/show

Thank you all of you I was just thinking and that is when I always get into trouble. When I went and got what I could find for a lead while ago I could always hang myself with it Ha! Ha! I will have to order a better one or wait for a show but I got like thin cord and it's 36" they had no 30" and the next was 24". Will let Eli try this evening with that and see how we do.

Thank you for the reminder children do get discouraged and I hope he continues to be as happy as he was last night and I will do all I can to help him. I must say very good food for thought not just Eli there is also Jaycee. I will try to help Eli develop a system he is my animal lover that will help.
Thanks again to all of you let you know how this goes or not and if anyone can think of anything else good or bad let me know please.

Rita Jean

Oh, and remember to not over-do it with Jaycee either…you want her to like it as well. 😃 😉

@renaultf1:

Can you maybe elaborate on "the routine" for Rita - she might not know what you mean and it would probably be helpful for her son.

How soon I forget. :rolleyes: In class they should teach you the overall routine in the ring, i.e. when to line up, go around, placing your dog on the table, the down-and-back, etc. All of that isn't too bad after you practice in class a few times and then you just have to pay attention if the judge asks for something else. They may or may not teach you the finer details on how to do things since that can vary from breed to breed and individual styles and their familiarity with the breed. For the "system" I was referring to, is how to handle the transitions between each of the steps, and each of the individual steps. So, for instance, after I enter the ring and getting ready to stack her in the line, I would secure the chain on my dog's neck with my right hand, toss the end of the lead over my shoulder with my left hand as I'm kneeling to the ground, secure her head with my right hand (Control the head, control the dog!), place all four legs from the front left, front right, back left, back right always using my left hand (while I still have my right hand against her head) and complete stacking her by the time I can count to four…. If you work out those types of fine details, then the handler and the dog will have a sense of familiarity of what goes on and it will be routine for both, hopefully. I'm personally not quite there yet, but I'm working towards it.

Nemo thank you for the information. I read it to my son and he was going to write it down and start trying to do it. Thank you again for the information.

Rita Jean

Please do not push either of them into the ring… let them work together.. attend shows and watch both Jr Show Classes and confomation... and if possible.. try to hook up with a handler that might be showing a Basenji or a Breeder.... and talk about showing....

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