How do I educate my vet?

With Trouper's result coming back as affected, I now need to go and alert my vet to the situation. I know they know nothing about Fanconi (there isn't another B in Scotland for nearly 100 miles). How should I educate them?

Also, what steps do I now need to take? I know about the strip tests - can I just by diabeties strips from chemist? Should I have bloods taken etc???

I've never dealt with this before and feel so distant from everyone being located where I am. I know you lot on here will give me all the help and advise I need. 🙂

Vicki - remember that Fanconi doesnt solely affect Basenji - my own vet has had experience of it in various breeds, including a local Wolfhound breeder.

I printed off the Fanconi protocol and passed it to my vet, but luckily he already had it.

You can buy the strips to test pee in Boots - just dont say they are for a dog - they refused to sell them to me. Had to find another branch and say they were for me…

The advice i have been given for Tilly is to strip test her, and it is only if she starts spilling sugar in her pee that you should then get the bloods done. Just because he has had the result as probably affected does not mean he will definately develop symptoms.

As long as your vet is willing to work with you and learn, you won't have a problem dealing with the fanconi. Just go to them and explain your test results, that genetically he has fanconi, but you don't know when (or possibly if) the disease will start to take effect. Bring a copy of the Protocol to your vet and ask them to read it and keep on file. They will usually do some digging to learn more about the disease at that point. But really it is very easy to diagnose and treat from the vet's standpoint. The hard part is how the dog responds to treatment and how well he'll take his meds.

The Protocol explains step by step what tests need to be run to diagnose the disease, and then what tests need to be done to determine the dosage of meds. It has clear charts and descriptions of how to interpret the results, so your vet can advise you on what to give. Also the biggest help is that Dr. Gonto is wonderful about working with owners and vets, so anytime you have questions you can contact him and he will work with you. When your vet starts you on treatment they can contact each other to make sure you guys are interpreting the Protocol correctly.

The only thing you really need to worry about now is making sure you find a place where you can use the blood gas machine for calculating bicarb dosage. Most regular vet clinics don't have this machine, usually just emergency vets, and it can be expensive to use. Also if you don't know a vet clinic in the area, most human hospitals have one. Ask around to see who will let you bring in dog's blood to use it. The test needs to be run very quickly after blood is drawn, so you might need to get the blood drawn at the vet with the machine or the nearest one to the human hospital. But your regular vet can do the other stuff.

Other than that, it's just sit and wait. You'll need to test the urine for several days in a row each month, and the more often the better. As soon as you start seeing the strip change colors, then it's off to the vet for the workups. The main strip test brand here is Bayer, they sell something called Diastix. You can order them online, but I'm not sure how bad shipping would be to you. I don't know what other brands are out there, but I would think you could find something at a local pharmacy. They are glucose urine test strips, do not get the strips that check ketones.

I'm very sorry to hear about Trouper's results, I hope that he doesn't develop anything for a long time! How old is Trouper? Usually the disease starts around ages 4-7, but sometimes not until their teens.

Thanks Guys. I took the protocol along to the vet today so they can study it in preparation.

I also managed to get Diastix testing strips so will start tonight!!

Trouper is 2 1/2 years old. I think he is a super young man, really compact and neat and was hoping that maybe someone would want to use him at stud but that probably won't happen now. 😞

We love him dearly and are dreading the prospect of him being ill etc. Hopefully my vet will do his homework.

I'm sorry to hear this about your baby - I hope all goes as well as it can for you…

@Elscodobermann:

remember that Fanconi doesnt solely affect Basenji - my own vet has had experience of it in various breeds, including a local Wolfhound breeder.

This is very true; another friend with an affected Basenji has a vet that has been treating a Stafford with it.
I gave my own vet the protocol some years ago in the hope that I would never have to use it. He didn't know anything about it prior to that; but my GP did when I mentioned it in passing to her!

@Benkura:

Thanks Guys. I took the protocol along to the vet today so they can study it in preparation.

I also managed to get Diastix testing strips so will start tonight!!

Trouper is 2 1/2 years old. I think he is a super young man, really compact and neat and was hoping that maybe someone would want to use him at stud but that probably won't happen now. 😞

We love him dearly and are dreading the prospect of him being ill etc. Hopefully my vet will do his homework.

I don't know if in Europe that semen collection is done a lot or the cost, but even with an Affected male that really has something to offer the breed in not lossing genes… you can bred to a clear bitch and while, yes you will get all carriers, you will not get any affecteds. Then you take the carrier to a clear and test those pups, you can still take another carrier to a clear, but you should % wise get some clears, so then clear to clear = clear.....

Good luck with Trouper....

Tanza, the problem with using frozen semen in this country (AI) is the dog must have had a litter naturally before you can do AI. Same goes with bitches. Although not sure what the rulings are on the continent.

@Benkura:

Tanza, the problem with using frozen semen in this country (AI) is the dog must have had a litter naturally before you can do AI. Same goes with bitches. Although not sure what the rulings are on the continent.

Well that is too bad if that is the case…. but then since he is only 2 1/2 you could still use him "natural" if you really wanted pups from him to carry on the genes. All depends again on what he has to offer..... or if there are litter brothers that might have turned out carriers instead of affected... lots of different things to consider... Never an easy decision....

Also, I will say just as an FYI... When Jaadii became affected, within a year or so, he was neutered. Lower hormone levels for sure helped him live a bit longer on the protocol. Just something to keep in mind.

His brother is my other boy 'Cahnce' who is Clear. It's just Chance & Trouper are chalk and cheese and both have good to offer the breed.

I did wonder whether neutering him would be beneficial or not. Wasn't sure if it might induce too much stress. However, I would have to stop showing him if I did that and he already has 1 CC.

@Benkura:

His brother is my other boy 'Cahnce' who is Clear. It's just Chance & Trouper are chalk and cheese and both have good to offer the breed.

I did wonder whether neutering him would be beneficial or not. Wasn't sure if it might induce too much stress. However, I would have to stop showing him if I did that and he already has 1 CC.

I would not worry about doing it now… only something to consider "IF" he starts showing symptoms.... When Jaadii came down with Fanconi it was before the DNA test was available, so no one knew until he started spilling sugar. He was fine 11 months out of the year, but during Basenji breeding season he was a mess... and that was a lot of stress on him...

So being neutered was not stressful, it was NOT being neutered that was. That said, not all dogs are alike... each are different... just putting in what we found with Jaadii....

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