Teeth

Hi. My 12 yr old female used to let me clean her teeth regularly but that has changed n the last year. She needs a professional cleaning BUT im really concerned about Anesthesia Risks at this age.

Any suggestions and/or opinions???

Thanks in advance

Is she in good health otherwise? If so, then I wouldn't be as concerned. If she in good health then the benefits of getting it outweigh the negatives. Of course, always make sure your vet knows to use the right anesthesia, as hounds generally need one that is safe considering their lean muscle to fat ratio.

Blood work, Blood work… before any decisions... and your Vet will be able to tell you if teeth cleaning could be a problem. If Blood work is good, should not be a problem. I will say, however that it seems these days Vet's recomment a pain killer that you rub on the gums, I have had more then one experience with this medication and I would NEVER use it... all of my Basenjis react in a real negative way to it and spend all their time crying/whinning... and are not without pain....

she is in great health…does look or act like 12yr old. Her diet is great...she doesnt drop food...has no issues chewing...but i her gum do bleed a bit when i brush them and beginning to notice bad breath.

Like pat said, the bloodwork is the best pre-precedure plan. If all is well then it's probably a good idea

@Henna420:

Hi. My 12 yr old female used to let me clean her teeth regularly but that has changed n the last year.

Probably they are hurting her, so she now objects to the procedure. Anesthetic for teeth cleaning is usually safe, but not always. I know of a recent case (not a Basenji) where they lost a dog during teeth cleaning. Did someone make a mistake, or just one of those impossible to predict circumstances? Who knows, but they couldn't revive the dog despite all efforts being made. That said, most such procedures are routine. I had to have teeth pulled/cleaning on my aging Border Collie a couple of times, and he had no issues with the anesthetic. He did have repeated oral infections, which likely were the cause of his demise at 15 years old…...something to be said for taking good care of the teeth!

My Becca just got her teeth cleaned about a month or so ago. She is 7. Make sure they do the bloodwork first and the will tell you if everything is good. She came back all dopey eyed and a super cuddle bug to me. She had a few teeth pulled and was on MetaCam and antibiotics afterwards. Took her about 4 days to get back to herself.

Your Becca is am example of the issue. I never knew til Arwen began having issues that dogs should start cleanings by 2 or 3, brushing a few times a week even before that. I forget the stats, but something like 70 percent have teeth issues by the age of 3. So I urge you all to get them all done young. What we accepted as just bad dog breathe almost always indicates a problem.

I can only add to the above, when Arwen resists brushing, I know to look for abscesses. Even with cleaning every 3 mos AND daily brushing, she still flares up. (she has autoimmune disorder, reacts to plaque).

I agree Debra. Oakley just turned two and he is having a dental cleaning in February. While, my vet doesn't necessarily think its necessary he does have plaque that needs to be taken care of. Even though vets know dental is key to health most still think dental cleanings are reactionary not precautionary. Nevertheless, Oak will be getting his done soon

@DebraDownSouth:

Your Becca is am example of the issue. I never knew til Arwen began having issues that dogs should start cleanings by 2 or 3, brushing a few times a week even before that. I forget the stats, but something like 70 percent have teeth issues by the age of 3. So I urge you all to get them all done young. What we accepted as just bad dog breathe almost always indicates a problem.

I did not know that they should have teeth cleanings every 2-3 years. This is very helpful information. My boy, Tucker, has enamel hypoplasia and has to go see a dental specialist every year. His teeth accumlate plaque a little faster because they are rougher. He goes back to see the doggy dentist in Jan-Feb or whenever I can get him in. The specialist will let me know if he needs a cleaning with more capping then.

Well they actually suggest routine checks at least yearly, cleaning if needed. When I fed raw, my dogs, never a one, ever needed their teeth cleaned. And the vet felt Cara's were fine last year, but who knows in Feb.. she may need them cleaned (she'll be 3). If you make brushing a routine, you may not have to have it done. But because of Arwen's autoimmune disorder, hers have to be cleaned every 3 mos as she reacts to plaque even tho there is almost no tartar on them at cleaning time. 😞

So I had to go look at the stats and info. The only ones I find are like this, examine teeth, clean if necessary. But if 80 percent have issues by 3, then they probably need scaling before unless you are brushing regularly.

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/dental-disease-cats-dogs

::::: Equal Opportunity Bacteria

Some 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats show signs of oral disease by age three, according to the American Veterinary Dental Society. However, problems can start at a much younger age. “I have taken puppy or kitten teeth out of animals that are six or seven months of age, and there is already tartar buildup,” notes Rosenblad, who teaches veterinary dentistry at Tufts and is president of the Veterinary Alumni Association.::::::

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