Seeking a new family member from Texas


  • Hi yall, I am new to Basenjis. We have always had tosa inus, or fila brasileiros (which need experienced owners). But now we are older, we are looking to get a smaller dog. I am hoping to get some good info here to make a good choice on a healthy pet.


  • @msjames - please read up on them...
    Basenjis typically only come in season once a year in the late summer/early fall. Pups are typically born Nov/Dec/Jan and litters are only 4 to 6 puppies on average. You really would be looking to find a responsible breeder and get on a reservation list for Fall/Winter of 2022 at this time. You can search for breeders by state at www.basenji.org (Basenji Club of America website) also there is a link for the Basenji Club of America breeder referral person. It is important that you verify health testing and suggest that you check this out for yourself. The most important tests are Fanconi and PRA DNA testing. Sire/Dam's should be tested before breeding as these are late onset. You can learn about Fanconi and PRA at www.basenji.org. And you can check out DNA testing at www.ofa.org as those tests are public knowledge. You just need the registered names or registration numbers. I always suggest that you do the homework and do check this out. There are many scam sites out there these days, so be very careful about sending money, as in don't do it. Note however if you are looking for a dog that is hyperallergic, regardless of what you read, Basenjis are not. They do shed and they do have dander and while they are good with some with allergies, it is not a given. You need to visit with them in person and more than one time. Also while they do not bark like most dogs, they can bark and they make all other dog noises and then some! They are NOT silent. Basenjis should be always kept on leash unless in a secure area as they are mostly a sight hound (but they do scent also) and what they see they chase. They are a sight hound from the hound group, what they see they chase.
    Also when you limit yourself to a color or sex, because Basenji litters are small (4 to 6) puppies, it is up to nature to decide on color/sex. So it is better to be open to either. Of course if you already have a Basenji, sex of the pup/adult could be important as it is always recommended that opposite sexes do better together.

    Here is a link about finding a responsible breeder - https://bconc.org/finding-breeders-red-flags


  • @msjames, @tanza did you a solid favor outlining expectations. Networking really is key to finding a "reputable" breeder. Most show their dogs and are connected to other breeders through showing. They all seem to know who is planning a litter and who isn't. I completely agree with Pat that you should meet your breeder in person prior to the puppies even being born. You can learn a lot.

    Is a Basenji right for you? If you want a dog to hang with you in the driveway with the garage door open as you chat with neighbors, or stand calmly with the front door open as you receive a UPS package... ABSOLUTELY NOT!!! Basenjis will bolt. they'll be gone in a second. They see it. They chase it. And if you think you have them trained... no. They've trained you. When they see it they will chase it.

    Basenjis, in my experience, need exercise. Mine get two walks a day. When they don't, they can be destructive. They're not shy about expressing frustration or displeasure through chewing up your best stuff. A big secure yard can mitigate this, but that's not a guarantee. They love seeing outside, so keep your blinds and drapes open otherwise they may open them themselves even if that requires chewing through them. They will climb onto windowsills, tables and low counter tops. They are capable of scaling a six-foot fence. They are known to climb trees. These are extreme examples, but better to know now.

    They are super affectionate. They can be trained... to a point. They are clowns and provide endless entertainment. A Basenji baroo is the best sound ever! They love to snuggle and will sleep on your bed and under the spreads and sheets if you let them. They love to share body heat. Tail twitches when I return home are the best!

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