Heat cycle
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  • First, why do you want to breed her? Has she been health tested? Bulldogs are known for many health issues and are known for whelping issues. Does her breeder agree with breeding her? Is the male health tested? And by health testing, that doesn't just mean a vet visit.
    Regarding breeding, find yourself a reproduction Vet for breeding advise. Do testing to see when the best time for breeding is...
    However, in the end.... think twice about breeding at all

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    Thanks for the advice. I have done all the reading into breeding for the last two years. I am aware of these things and she is a registered bulldog with good champions in her blood line. I was unsure to her cycle as it should be a lot heavier by now ... I was thinking maybe her body isn't mature enough yet so there for I won't be breeding her until then.

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  • @berni How about her breeder? Do they agree with breeding her? Reading about is not the same a learning and having a mentor for the breed... please think twice about breeding.... and find yourself in the breed.... And please find a Board Certified Reproduction Vet

    last edited by tanza
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  • @berni said in Heat cycle:

    Thanks for the advice. I have done all the reading into breeding for the last two years. I am aware of these things and she is a registered bulldog with good champions in her blood line. I was unsure to her cycle as it should be a lot heavier by now ... I was thinking maybe her body isn't mature enough yet so there for I won't be breeding her until then.

    Nearly every puppymill dog out there, much less backyard bred, have "good champions in" their blood line. But do you know what makes a "good champion"? It isn't just the title. It is health clearances for generations, it is a foundation of knowledge about what issues that dog's line has behind or has produced? It's about knowing if the dog you want to breed genetically and otherwise is a match for the one you are looking at. I have looked at 20 studs before selecting a right one.

    As for registered... and? See puppymill/byb. The fact that the breeder did not place this dog with you on a limited registration or co-own so that he/she could guide you in showing, making sure all health testing done, and approval of the right stud if/when the time came tells me a lot. I have friends in the bulldog breed from nearly 40 years... the good breeders out there don't place dogs to be bred without contracts on what is first required. So you are not going to find a quality stud because they won't touch your bitch with a 100 ft pole. Which means you are going to just mate her to any "registered" dog. You won't be in spitting distance of the clue bucket how many horrible genetic diseases you are bringing to her offspring, nor... I guess ... care about the heartbreak and suffering of the families who trust that you knew what you were doing when you bred... because of course the only ones who would get such a puppy aren't knowledgeable enough to know better.

    If you really want to get into breeding, do it right. Spay your pet, find a mentor. Study and learn genetics and genetic lines. Find a dog that some responsible breeder will co-own with you while you learn and sign off only when you've done things right. Love your pet, care about the welfare of produced pets and the people you get involved with puppies you produce. Do it right.

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  • @berni said in Heat cycle:

    Thanks for the advice. I have done all the reading into breeding for the last two years. I am aware of these things and she is a registered bulldog with good champions in her blood line. I was unsure to her cycle as it should be a lot heavier by now<<

    Btw, that simple comment shows that you haven't begun to read or understand. "A lot heavier" is a nonsense comment. Bitches can be fertile with almost no perceptible blood shown. Heavier doesn't have anything to do with fertility.

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