• Please post foods that are poisonous to dogs here:

    Onion and Garlic
    Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

    Toxin
    S-methylcysteine sulfoxide, n-propyl disulfide, methyl disulfide, allyl disulfide

    Source
    Onion or garlic (Allium spp.) including those that are fresh as well as those dried for use as spices.

    General Information
    Garlic and onion are used as flavor enhancers in food. Some human baby foods have onion in them, and it is not recommended to feed them to pets. In dogs and cats, garlic and onion can cause Heinz body anemia, resulting in a breakdown of the red blood cells and anemia. The very small amounts of garlic that are present in some commercial pet foods have not be shown to cause any problems.

    The bulbs, bulbets, flowers, and stems of the garlic and onion are all poisonous.

    Toxic Dose
    Unknown. Cats appear to be more sensitive than dogs.

    Signs
    Vomiting, diarrhea, anemia, discolored urine, weakness, liver damage, allergic reactions, asthmatic attacks, and in case of skin exposure, contact dermatitis.

    Immediate Action
    Induce vomiting and seek veterinary attention. If dermal (skin) exposure, bathe thoroughly and contact a veterinarian.


  • Mushroom
    Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

    Toxin
    Ibotenic acid, indoles, muscimol, gyromitrin, amanitin, phalloidin, psilocybin, or psilocyn.

    Source
    Mushrooms including Amantia phalloides (death angel), A. virosa (destroying angel), A. muscaria (fly agaric), some Boletus spp., Chlorophyllum molybdites (backyard mushrooms), some Clitocybe spp., Cortinarius spp., Galerina spp., Gyromita spp. (false morels), Inocybe spp., and some Psilocybe spp. ('magic mushroom').
    General Information
    The kind of toxin in mushrooms vary with species. Some cause CNS effects including hallucinations, hyperactivity, and coma. Others damage the liver, heart, or kidneys causing death. Clinical signs usually occur within 6-8 hours following ingestion. Mushrooms grow in the wild in most areas, and pets need to be closely supervised to prevent ingestion, if access to the mushrooms cannot be prevented.

    Toxic Dose
    Varies with the species of the mushroom.

    Signs
    Abdominal pain, ataxia, coma, depression, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hallucinations, hyperthermia, tearing, urination, drooling, defecation, seizures, liver failure, kidney failure, and death.

    Immediate Action
    Induce vomiting if the patient is alert. Seek veterinary attention.

    This means mushrooms found on feces….


  • Macadamia Nuts
    Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

    Toxin
    Unknown

    Source
    Macadamia Nuts

    General Information
    Macadamia nuts are the fruit of the trees of Macadamia integrifolia and Macadamia tetraphylla. These trees are indigenous to Madagascar and Australia. They were introduced into Hawaii and California about 100 years ago. Symptoms usually start within 3-12 hours of ingesting the nuts, and tend to resolve over 24 hours.

    Toxic Dose
    0.9 grams per pound of body weight.

    Signs
    Lethargy, vomiting, and hyperthermia are initial symptoms with progression to ataxia or hind-limb paresis. Also seen are tremors, abdominal pain, lameness, joint stiffness, and pale mucous membranes.

    Immediate Action
    Induce vomiting if ingestion was within the past hour. Seek veterinary attention.

    I had never heard of this one. Anyone ever experience anything with these?


  • Grapes/Raisins
    Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

    Toxin
    Thought to be due to an unknown compound in the "fleshy" part of the grape. There have been no problems associated with grape seed extract.

    Source
    Grapes and raisins.

    General Information
    Many dogs like raisins and grapes. They should only be given in a very limited amount on an infrequent basis, and should not be left where a dog or cat can have access to them. The unknown toxin damages the kidneys.

    Toxic Dose
    One known amount is 1 ounce of fruit per 2.2 pounds of body weight.

    Signs
    Vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, lethargy, or abdominal pain.

    Immediate Action
    Induce vomiting and seek veterinary attention.

    I remember talking about this one before. This is pretty interesting.


  • Chocolate and Caffeine
    Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

    Toxin
    Methylxanthines

    Source
    Chocolate, coffee, tea, theobromine, caffeine, and theophylline.

    General Information
    Theobromine is found in chocolate, cocoa beans, cocoa bean hulls (landscape bedding), cola, and tea. Milk chocolate contains 44 mg/oz. and unsweetened baking chocolate contains 390 mg/oz.

    Caffeine is found in coffee, tea, chocolate, colas, and human stimulants.

    Theophylline is found in tea and human and veterinary preparations.

    Caffeine and theobromine have an effect on animals similar to that on people. They increase the breathing and heart rate, sometimes causing irregular beating of the heart. They cause restlessness because of the changes at the cellular level with calcium and energy sources. Caffeine also directly stimulates the myocardium and central nervous system.

    Note: Some methylxanthines may be reabsorbed from the urinary bladder.

    Toxic Dose
    Symptoms occur with the ingestion of 45 mg per pound of body weight. Theobromine deaths have been reported after ingestion of 52 mg per pound of body weight.

    Caffeine is toxic at about 63 mg per pound of body weight.

    Signs
    Common signs include vomiting, diarrhea, panting, hyperactivity, restlessness, ataxia, muscle tremors, increased or decreased heart rate, irregular heart rhythm, increased body temperature. Seizures, coma, or death may occur. Less frequent symptoms include abdominal pain and blood in the urine.

    Immediate Action
    Induce vomiting and seek veterinary attention.

    We have all heard this one I expect…..


  • I know all about the $150 onion … Chase ate Fajita mix and that 1/2 cup of onion cost me about $100 in vet bills but he is okay now.


  • You know, until I read this I didnt know garlic could be bad. I have added garlic to my dog's food for years….and they love it. I will definately stop now.


  • It's good you posted this info. Aren't there some dog foods that have garlic in them? I've heard or read that nuts in general are not good for the dog. One of my Bs got a hold of and ate a whole See's Candies chocolate bar. No symptoms appeared thankfully.


  • Hi, I'm new around here. I just wanted to add that xylitol is highly toxic to dogs. It is a type of sugar and is found in gum, toothpaste, diet foods etc. A very small amount can kill your dog. My basenji died in february. A day after I he died I saw in the news that xylitol was deadly for canines. I had used it very occationally and worried I had killed my own dog. When I question the vet, she had never heard of it. She researched xylitol with poison control and luckly put my fears about killing my basenji to rest. I now read label very carefully and do not allow it in my house. Just another note. My dentist recommended that I use it for my kids to prevent tooth decay. He also did not know it was poisonous.


  • I really don't get the garlic thing. I mean, people have fed dogs garlic for y-e-a-r-s as a flavoring and as a flea deterent {old wives' tale?}. Or even the onions. Dogs survived on table scraps, which often have some onion somewhere for years also.

    Not doubting the science, just baffled.

    Gypsy nearly died of pancreatitis {caused by poison} several years ago - I think I've told the story before – and we brought her from back from the brink of death {vets said she couldn't be saved} w/ice chips and then broth made of chicken, onions,garlic, carrots, and celery.

    Crazy . . .


  • A very good friend of mine have a bitch with pancreatitis from over eating an entire cake (not chocolate, but I don't remember what, Lisa might remember), she is now on meds for the rest of her life…. and again I think it was a cake, Lisa.... do you remember what Matuko ate?

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